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Exterior Electrical Feed-Does it Fly?


randynavarro
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If you got down into the nuts and bolts of the code you might well find some reason why that rig isn't kosher, but if it's only 8' and isn't apt to be snagged and pulled, I'd make a quick note in the full report and move on. Usually when I see something like that it'll only have a staple in the wall for strain relief, so this would be a step up.

Brian G.

Bigger Fish Abound [:-goldfis

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Originally posted by randynavarro

Whaddya think? Does this suffice for proper strain relief?

The cable fed a small outbuilding about 8' away. Not a lot of length.

In terms of the rule that requires the cable to be secured near the box, that cleat is probably ok.

In terms of supporting the cable in tension as it passes through the air, it's certainly not ok. If that's NM cable, it can't be used like that at all -- it can't be exposed to sunlight or wet conditions. If that's UF cable, it can't be strung through the air unless it's supported by a messenger wire and done in a way that results in no tension on the conductors. (And, of course, the UF cable would have to be UV rated.)

- Jim Katen, Oregon

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If I may I'll ask a question too, (I really do like stirring the pot because I hate burnt soup) I see that it is attached to a wood siding. Is that strong enough? I know if it was vinyl the bracket would just rip out the siding. Should the bracket screws dig deeper than just the siding? Also, it may just be dirt, but is the plank it is attached too separated a little from the house. As in maybe the screws pushed it away from the house a little. I see a black line at the bottom of the plank but not with any of the others in the photo.

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Thank you.

John, the plastic cleat is screwed to the siding. I'm comfortable that it's strong enough because its only 8' of cable or so.

As Jim has stated, the wire itself is wrong. It is UF wire. I didn't take the time to get up on a ladder and read all the labeling on the wire. As Brian has said, there's much bigger fish to fry, namely the foundation -- do'oh!!

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Aye, caught the wire part, I was just asking about the siding as I don't know and was trying to expand my knowledge base of those little things. I figure it would be as wood siding it more firmly attached than vinyl. As for the foundation, no worries, I had a Realtor once tell me that foundations are only a cosmetic item anyways (<---that was a joke).

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Originally posted by sepefrio

If I may I'll ask a question too, (I really do like stirring the pot because I hate burnt soup) I see that it is attached to a wood siding. Is that strong enough? I know if it was vinyl the bracket would just rip out the siding. Should the bracket screws dig deeper than just the siding?

*If* the cable were allowed to be strung through the air, it would need to be securely attached at each end.

The NEC section that covers the attachment of outside feeders to the side of a building (225.16) refers us to the section that covers the attachement of service drops to the building (230.27). That section says:

Means of Attachment. Multiconductor cables used for service drops shall be attached to buildings or other structures by fittings identified for use with service conductors. . . . (it goes on to talk about attachement of open conductors).

Presumably, a "fitting identified for use with service conductors" will have installation instructions that will tell us whether or not it's ok to attach it to siding only.

Also, it may just be dirt, but is the plank it is attached too separated a little from the house. As in maybe the screws pushed it away from the house a little. I see a black line at the bottom of the plank but not with any of the others in the photo.

I also see a gap under that siding board. It's probably impossible, in the context of that photo, though, to say whether or not the siding is pulling away in reaction to the cable or the cleat.

- Jim Katen, Oregon

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Note to self: Clean your screen dumbass!

When I first looked at it I thought it was vinyl siding because of the two perfectly located weep holes on the bottom of the board that the cleat is attached to.

Then I saw someone said it was wood siding. Went back to look and the two weepholes were now in the middle of the board. Hmm, just a couple of little dots on the screen, not the pictuere.

Clean your screen dumbass! Guess I'll go do that now.

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