Jump to content

hardboard siding comment check


CheckItOut
 Share

Recommended Posts

I've seen comments ranging from very vauge, ie "hardboard siding moisture damaged on house. A contractor should evaluate siding and repair as necessary" to extreme, ie "this type of siding is prone to failure and has been subject to class action law suites... blah, blah, blah"

What I have used was more in the middle and having experience with owning houses with hardboard, I know that cracks in the coating on the drip edges does not mean the siding has to be replaced. Painting (several coats) with Duration or the like can seal the cracks and keep it in service for many years without furhter problems.

So, I have come up with what I think is a realistic comment when thin cracks are evident on the lower edge with no visible swelling of the siding. What do you think?

Major Repair Many sections of the hardboard siding exhibit cracking on its drip edge (bottom edge) and unsealed nail heads that have penetrated the surface of the siding. These cracks and nail holes can allow moisture intrusion that can lead to irreparable damage over time. Cracks and nail heads can be sealed to help prevent moisture intrusion. It is beyond the scope of this inspection to pinpoint each piece of siding that needs attention. A contractor should evaluate siding and repair as necessary.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

this type of siding is prone to failure and has been subject to class action law suites... blah, blah, blah"

There's nothing extreme about that statement. It's a fact. If you're aware of fact like this, shouldn't you advise your client?

I much prefer the factual, first person advice in the statement quoted to the passive inspector speak in the passage up for evaluation.

If you were the client, which would you prefer?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi,

Besides the inspectorspeak, I guess I'm having a hard time understanding why, if you don't consider it a big deal, you'd place "Major repair" in front of that comment. If it's not that big a deal, why not say something like:

The siding needs maintenance - At many places on the exterior, there are unpainted/unsealed nail heads and siding drip edges that over time will allow moisture intrusion to eventually ruin the siding. Have a competent painter - one that understands the unique finishing requirements for this siding - go over the exterior and as necessary caulk and repaint the siding. ?

Seems to me, that's a whole lot more helpful than what you've got. I could be wrong though, have been many times before.

ONE TEAM - ONE FIGHT!!!

Mike

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Major Repair Many sections of the hardboard siding exhibit cracking on its drip edge (bottom edge) and unsealed nail heads that have penetrated the surface of the siding. These cracks and nail holes can allow moisture intrusion that can lead to irreparable damage over time. Cracks and nail heads can be sealed to help prevent moisture intrusion. It is beyond the scope of this inspection to pinpoint each piece of siding that needs attention. A contractor should evaluate siding and repair as necessary.

What your narrative is missing is a clear How this what affects the clientid="blue">, and a clear What should the client do to avoid problems.id="blue">

Looks like you're too focused on What is wrongid="blue">.

What I would suggest is after you have completed your analysis, and before you write the narrative, decide first what it is that you are going to tell the client to doid="blue">. Then write the narrative keeping the What id="blue"> is wrong, and how id="blue"> it affects the client consistentid="blue"> with What the client should do.id="blue">

Cracking siding means something to you and me, but means nothing to the client, nor the bit about the nails. Basically you're either saying the siding is deteriorated and if the client doesn't want it fully damaged, which will require the sidings replacement, then the client should get the siding painted with an extra ordinary paint, or you're saying the siding is damaged, and it will need to be replaced; one or the other.

The client understands words like: problem, damaged, deteriorated etc., but they really don't understand all the mumbo jumbo we spill out regularly.

I am convinced now the most important part of writing narrative is getting the telling the client what to do part rightid="blue">, followed by how it affects the client and the least important is what is wrong. We HI's tend to put all of our efforts into describing in contractor detail what is wrong.

If you're right about what's wrong, but wrong about what the client should do, then you're as good as wrong.

Chris, Oregon

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks for the comments.

The reason it is titled as a major repair is b/c I define a major repair as something that will cost $500 or more. Other repairs are titled as minor.

I still don't feel the need to tell them about a law suite they can't participate in. If I did that, I'd have to tell them about any other legal challenge/settlement that the other products on the subject house have been involved in. If it was an on-going, open issue, yes, they should be informed. Plus, the cracks on the drip edges are not covered by warranty or law suite last time I called.

The other issue is that people tend to get very excited and feel the whole house will need to be re-sidded. I have many years of personal experience with this siding with my personal house and rental houses I own. I've seen this material in various stages and know what works for repair and what does not.

However, I do understand your points and I can certainly make things clearer after reading your comments.

Thanks again...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...