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lights flicker


gary951
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My lights flicker when the washing machine is on or the microwave. If they are both on they flip the circuit breaker. Is it the breaker getting old or bad wiring?

Maybe both. We can't tell from here. The washing machine and the microwave really have no business being on the same circuit. Together, they're drawing too much current for the circuit and the breaker is probably just doing its job.

Call an electrician.

- Jim Katen, Oregon

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Maybe both.

Amperage and Voltage are inversely proportionate, meaning as one goes down the other goes up. A loose electrical connection will cause a condition like you're describing. Best thing to do is call a electrician to troubleshoot.

Electrical shocks can kill you, do not attempt repairs unless you are trained to work on electrical wiring.

Edit: I see Jim was hanging out at the same time.

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I don’t think I would say that V and I are always inversely proportional.

Take the standard electrical equation V=IR

Where:

V= voltage

I = current

R = resistance

V is directly proportional to IR, as one quantity increases so must the other and vice-versa.

If R remains constant then as V or I increases, then so must the other in a proportional manner.

Ex:

100V = 10 amps x 10 Ohms

200V = 20 amps x 10 Ohms

1000V = 100 amps x 10 Ohms

Edited later:

Only when R varies will can V or I change in an inverse relation. If R increases either I must can decrease or V must can increase (or a little of both). Although, when R changes V and I can also change in the same direction as the change in R. In that case they would not be inversely related.

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I don’t think I would say that V and I are always inversely proportional.

Take the standard electrical equation V=IR

Where:

V= voltage

I = current

R = resistance

V is directly proportional to IR, as one quantity increases so must the other and vice-versa.

If R remains constant then as V or I increases, then so must the other in a proportional manner.

Ex:

100V = 10 amps x 10 Ohms

200V = 20 amps x 10 Ohms

1000V = 100 amps x 10 Ohms

Only when R varies will V or I change in an inverse relation. If R increases either I (current) must decrease or V must increase (or a little of both).

Well said, Scott.

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