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What's a fix for this?


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The cracked cap and painted surface accelerate the whole process. I would probably start with a new crown or cap flashing to prevent (or at least minimize) future moisture intrusion.

Unfortunately, concrete masonry units are merely a cementicious sponge. So, you definitely want moisture to evaporate as easily as it is absorbed.

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1. Remove the crown.

2. Stip the paint off down to the bare concrete.

3. Repair the joints, soak it down and apply a layer of CWM (Xypex) to it.

4. install counter flashings and then apply a layer of parging to the exterior.

5. Construct a reinforced crown with built-in drip edge and expansion joint on top.

ONE TEAM - ONE FIGHT!!!

Mike

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1. Remove the crown.

2. Stip the paint off down to the bare concrete.

3. Repair the joints, soak it down and apply a layer of CWM (Xypex) to it.

4. install counter flashings and then apply a layer of parging to the exterior.

5. Construct a reinforced crown with built-in drip edge and expansion joint on top.

ONE TEAM - ONE FIGHT!!!

Mike

Nice plan of attack, Mike. I mulled stucco over wire in my head and nixed it for a veriety of reasons.

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1. Remove the crown.

2. Stip the paint off down to the bare concrete.

3. Repair the joints, soak it down and apply a layer of CWM (Xypex) to it.

4. install counter flashings and then apply a layer of parging to the exterior.

5. Construct a reinforced crown with built-in drip edge and expansion joint on top.

ONE TEAM - ONE FIGHT!!!

Mike

What's 'CWM' Mike? I couldn't recognize it from the Xypex lineup. Thanks.

Marc

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CWM is crystalline waterproofing material. It's a catalyst. You apply it to wet concrete with a masonry brush and it reacts with the concrete to form water-blocking crystals in the first 3 to 4 inches of concrete from the surface. Xypex is just one brand.

ONE TEAM - ONE FIGHT!!!

Mike

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I didn't know that a home inspectors report could be influenced by a budget.

Marc

My guess is that Randy has spoken to his clients about the chimney and the thought of a full replacement was out of the question. Question being a bank account. So being the kind soul he is, he is going that extra mile for his client by trying to come up with a less expensive, but nearly same quality repair for them as a second option.

But then again, it's only a guess...

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Bad guess. Good try, though.

It's a 203k renovation loan. I have to ID things and call for their repair or replacement. It's not as easy as it might seem. As you all know, there can be dozens of items in a single home that need attention in some form or fashion.

In a 203k project, the challenge is figuring which things require attention. Even HUD/FHA themselves don't require all things to be repaired or replaced that otherwise would be detailed and recommended be repaired in an ordinary inspection report.

In this case, the chimney was just bad enough, IMO, and ugly enough to need some sort of work. I rarely call for chimney repairs in rehabs unless they're directly affecting the operation of gas appliances or about to fall down.

One could also make the argument that the chimney will do just fine. How long will it take for that chimney to actually start falling down? Another 10-20 years?

It could go either way. . .

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Bad guess. Good try, though.

It's a 203k renovation loan. I have to ID things and call for their repair or replacement. It's not as easy as it might seem. As you all know, there can be dozens of items in a single home that need attention in some form or fashion.

In a 203k project, the challenge is figuring which things require attention. Even HUD/FHA themselves don't require all things to be repaired or replaced that otherwise would be detailed and recommended be repaired in an ordinary inspection report.

Curious. What guides you in making such choices. HUD should at least offer guidelines as to what needs to be fixed and what can slide.

Marc

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Bad guess. Good try, though.

It's a 203k renovation loan. I have to ID things and call for their repair or replacement. It's not as easy as it might seem. As you all know, there can be dozens of items in a single home that need attention in some form or fashion.

In a 203k project, the challenge is figuring which things require attention. Even HUD/FHA themselves don't require all things to be repaired or replaced that otherwise would be detailed and recommended be repaired in an ordinary inspection report.

Curious. What guides you in making such choices. HUD should at least offer guidelines as to what needs to be fixed and what can slide.

Marc

Well, this directive seriously lowered the bar in 2005. Other than this list, there's only a handful of other general guidelines and criteria, many of which are open for interpretation.

It'd sure be easy to have a clear list, but as I've mentioned, how do you make a list for the hundreds of conditions that are present in homes.

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