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Hi Guys,

Not sure about which forum to put this in but since it's of an electrical nature....

I am inspecting a home tomorrow and my client just informed me the house was struck by lightning in 2009, but has since been repaired. Is there anything I should look for because of the phenomenon? I would assume most of the repairs have been addressed by now, but I'll find out more when I go in tomorrow.

I guess I'm just looking for what you've come across in your inspections about lightning strikes so I can have a "heads up" approach.

Thanks in advance

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Hi Guys,

Not sure about which forum to put this in but since it's of an electrical nature....

I am inspecting a home tomorrow and my client just informed me the house was struck by lightning in 2009, but has since been repaired. Is there anything I should look for because of the phenomenon? I would assume most of the repairs have been addressed by now, but I'll find out more when I go in tomorrow.

I guess I'm just looking for what you've come across in your inspections about lightning strikes so I can have a "heads up" approach.

Thanks in advance

Check the panel for any signs or scorch marks or discoloration. Look at the neutrals and grounds real good, they tend to take most of the power during a lighting strike.

Try to find out where the lighting struck (ask the owner if you can). See if you can see the repairs that were made. What kind of damage was done to the home? Fire?

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Check the panel for any signs or scorch marks or discoloration. Look at the neutrals and grounds real good, they tend to take most of the power during a lighting strike.

Try to find out where the lighting struck (ask the owner if you can). See if you can see the repairs that were made. What kind of damage was done to the home? Fire?

Thanks Scott, the panel and was my main concern as is the strike point, but I'll know more about specific damage and the subsequent repairs when I see it for the first time tomorrow.

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It sure would be nice if your client could get the actual documentation for the repairs from the seller before your inspection. There may be obvious indications, as Scott mentioned, but I can also see you spending way too much time searching for, and worrying about, stuff that just isn't there.

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Also, tell the buyer to ask the seller to obtain and provide a "CLUE" report. This will outline the insurance claim, the scope of repairs performed and the cost of the repairs. Kinda like a "carfax" for a house.

Know that your clients insurance company will see the clue before they insure the house.

Tom Corrigan

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I like Ian's "quote' from Red Adair (oil-well firefighter). :)

Thanks Rob!

OK, seller told me the lightning hit the tree in the backyard, sizzled a tree root black and traveled into the house via the 3 season sun-porch and proceeded to blow a ceramic tile into bits like shrapnel into the soffiting above. Fried all his big screen plasma, modem and other low voltage electronics.

Panel was hunky dory (I believe that's an inspection industry term?.. ) No damage to chase, or roof or branch wiring that I can see.

Thanks for advice guys,

Ian

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