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Replacing outdoor faucet


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Hi Fellas,

I am going to have to replace my outdoor faucet as it has been leaking lately and also want to replace the shutoff to it in the basement as it's looking rough also.

While Im sure I can run the new faucet through the wall after removing the old one pretty easy I am stumped as to how I can replace the shutoff valve? I want to use a ball valve instead of the old style compression one that is already. Is this a easy job to do?

But what stumps me as how do you solder copper pipe into a ball valve? or does it somehow crimp down onto the pipe? is that what a sharkbite ( I think thats what there called ?) does?

any tips would be great

Jeremy

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Hi Fellas,

I am going to have to replace my outdoor faucet as it has been leaking lately and also want to replace the shutoff to it in the basement as it's looking rough also.

While Im sure I can run the new faucet through the wall after removing the old one pretty easy I am stumped as to how I can replace the shutoff valve? I want to use a ball valve instead of the old style compression one that is already. Is this a easy job to do?

No offense, but easy is a relative term. If you're "stumped" about how to replace a valve, then I'd say it's going to be very difficult for you to do.

But what stumps me as how do you solder copper pipe into a ball valve? or does it somehow crimp down onto the pipe? is that what a sharkbite ( I think thats what there called ?) does?

When you go to buy the valve, you will find an assortment of different types. Some will have threaded connections, some will have sweat-on connections, and some will have press-on connections. You have to choose the valve that matches your needs.

Threaded fittings are nice if you plan to disassemble this arrangement in the future. Just start at one spot and screw your way to the end, so to speak.

Sweat-on fittings are simple if you're good a soldering. Just remember to disassemble the valve before sweating the brass fittings to the copper tubing, otherwise you can warp the valve body and cause it to leak.

Push-on fittings are simple and easy but more expensive and, as far as I know, impossible to undo.

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Sharkbites are great. They have a releasing tool as well and you can easily take them apart and put them back together again. The most important part with using them is to deburr the cut pipe (inside and out) before pushing it into the fitting. Also, make sure you push the pipe straight into the fitting (not on an angle). Make sure the pipe gets pushed all the way in. You mark the pipe for the depth of insertion for verification.

You can actually buy a Sharkbite ball valve to kill two birds with one stone. Heck, three or four birds if you need to transition between different materials and sizes.

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