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Water Heater


mdramis
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Hmmm,

Well, PVC, CPVC, Copper, Steel or PEX. Whether to the outside could depend on your local code, but all that is really required is within six to 24 inches of the floor.

Other than that, there isn't any restraint strapping installed on the tank (which seismic zone are you in?); the connectors are kinked, reducing their diameter (it says right in the installers' manuals that you may not reduce the diameter of the pipes into the water heater.); there aren't any heat traps and the connectors weren't configured with heat trap loops; and they've used romex where it's not allowed (has to be secured within 12 inches of the connection). Is there a disconnect within sight of that water heater? If not, that's bad ju-ju too.

ONE TEAM - ONE FIGHT!!!

Mike

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Yea, other than those few details it looks like a good installation. We can't use PVC here, has to be rated for hot water and same diameter as the TPR valve outlet (3/4 inch). I usually recommend a drip pan if it is an interior installation, whether or not the drain line is routed to the exterior (nobody ever does it, probably wasting ink). You really arent supposed to go into the drain pipe are you?

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Originally posted by homnspector

We can't use PVC here, has to be rated for hot water and same diameter as the TPR valve outlet (3/4 inch).

That's true everywhere that has a code, Mike just snafu'd a little there.

I usually recommend a drip pan if it is an interior installation, whether or not the drain line is routed to the exterior (nobody ever does it, probably wasting ink).

Waste your ink, that's how it should be done. I waste ink on several things like that, everytime. We can lead a horse to water, but...

You really arent supposed to go into the drain pipe are you?

No, but the code says something fuzzy like "an appropriate place of disposal", without any common sense specifics. I always argue common sense to my clients on these kinds of things.

"How will you ever know if it discharges?"

"How will you know if the valve is defective and leaking?"

"Will that standard PVC it's connected to be able to hold up for more than 5 minutes if it ever REALLY discharges?"

I do the same when I argue against running the TPR piping down to the drip pan instead of outside.

"If it discharges because of high pressure how much water will actually stay in that drip pan to drain away?"

"How long will that standard PVC drain line from the pan last if it ever REALLY discharges?"

"What's the cost to extend it to the exterior vs. the cost of water damage that might happen if this rig can't take it?"

Piping TPR's and condensate drains to the plumbing system should be strictly and expressly prohibited by all codes. It's dumb and lazy.

Brian G.

Noted Authority on Everything [^] [;)]

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I did a quick little re-inspect yesterday for some clients who had just moved in. It was for some electrical issues that turned out to be non-issues (hint...when testing outlets with a lamp, make sure the bulb isn't burnt out). Anyway...while I was there I thought I do a quick check on the water heater. During the initial inspection there was no TPR discharge line although only a few feet away was the copper piping for the exterior termination. I recommended a licensed plumber install an appropriate TPR discharge and reconnect it to the existing termination.

You think they used a plumber?

Download Attachment: icon_photo.gif 050628L020x.jpg

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It wasn't even a good quality garden hose!

I don't often get to see how called repairs are made...and maybe that's a good thing! [:-bigeyes

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Originally posted by Richard Moore

I recommended a licensed plumber install an appropriate TPR discharge and reconnect it to the existing termination.

You think they used a plumber?

It wasn't even a good quality garden hose!

I don't often get to see how called repairs are made...and maybe that's a good thing! [:-bigeyes

Good Lord..

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Originally posted by Richard Moore

I recommended a licensed plumber install an appropriate TPR discharge and reconnect it to the existing termination.

You think they used a plumber?

It wasn't even a good quality garden hose!

I don't often get to see how called repairs are made...and maybe that's a good thing! [:-bigeyes

A great illustration of why I haven't done reinspections for years. I tell them to get receipts and warranties. The repair person is responsible for his work.

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