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An Interesting Story: Some Construction Content


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Thanks Mike. Good read! You have to admire the way the house gradually grew from a one room shack to the home it is today. Maybe even more admirable is that there is photo documentation of most stages. Well, at least the exterior. It would have added to the fun to see photos of the interior evolving.

I'm not sure that I would want to inspect the place!

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I have to confess, It had me wistfully wishing I could drive out somewhere, plunk down a filing fee and start construction of my own place. Nowadays, that fee would probably have to be in the hundreds of thousands. I don't think they do this anymore anywhere in this country.

ONE TEAM - ONE FIGHT!!!

Mike

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There's lots of places you could do that, although getting to them is a logistical puzzle.

I like the idea of building a fun little place without a bunch of building inspector scolds harping away. There should be places where folks are allowed to have fun...sort of a free fire zone for building creativity.

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I have to confess, It had me wistfully wishing I could drive out somewhere, plunk down a filing fee and start construction of my own place. Nowadays, that fee would probably have to be in the hundreds of thousands. I don't think they do this anymore anywhere in this country.

ONE TEAM - ONE FIGHT!!!

Mike

There are some cheap lots out there that you can buy for 5 or 10 G. Water is scarce. I like Borrego Springs, and have imagined building a double garage for starters. We would just park a motor home beside it, or a trailer that could be moved inside for security. There's no work in the desert, unless you want to be a golf instructor at one of the courses. Maybe I'd open up a driving range on my property and wait for the wind to pile the balls into windrows.

I'd like to cruise around on some of those jeep roads in an old Model A with bald tires. What fun!

Here's a place that has some potential for two couples. 2 shacks on 2.5 acres for $44 G.

You can buy land just about anywhere down there for cheap, but then you will need permits to do this and that. Renovate an old shack anyway you like, and the people will thank you for doing it.

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Yeah,

I know there are places like that. $44K is still a lot of money. So isn't $10K or $5K. They plunked down $25 - less than a week's pay in those days, constructed their cabin under the deadline and they owned the land. That's pretty cool. 150 years ago folks rode out, staked out a square of ground, went to the nearest town, filed their land claim and they owned it.

A number of years ago I inspected a chicken coop that had been converted to a home in Seattle. It sat on a tiny little patch of ground between two other properties and had formerly belonged to one. The price was $107,000 for a place less than 300 square feet. Nobody seemed to think that it was unusual that someone was buying a converted chicken coop for over $100K. I just shook my head in amazement.

ONE TEAM - ONE FIGHT!!!

Mike

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Yeah,

I know there are places like that. $44K is still a lot of money. So isn't $10K or $5K. They plunked down $25 - less than a week's pay in those days, constructed their cabin under the deadline and they owned the land. That's pretty cool. 150 years ago folks rode out, staked out a square of ground, went to the nearest town, filed their land claim and they owned it.

That is what my Grandfather did in NE Montana in the early 1900s. Staked his claim, built a 'sod shanty', filed the claim papers, lived on the claim for a year and built his first home (after the sod shanty).

My brother, sister and I still have the original 10 acres that was the basis of the claim.

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In 1985, I staked a 10 acre claim in a little bay in the Northern Gulf Islands and established an oyster farm. My claim was under water, but it didn't cost much, something like $50 for the paperwork. A foreshore lease includes up to the high tide line.

I built a cabin on piers and had a nice little setup there, raising oysters from tiny microscopic 'spat'.

Never made much money at it, worked it part time when real work was slow, wrecked my back, but then sold it for a sizable profit. There are still oysters growing there, 4th owner.

The biggest enemy of the oyster grower is starfish. If it wasn't for starfish, I would have been buried in oysters.

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Ah.. the old-school ham-types..

The first guys to create an 'internet'! My late (2008) Uncle Joe was K1AWP, "A-1 Operator" award, ARRL. He was a Seabee in WW2...

He's now what the hams call 'a silent key'.. Great guy and was a fun guy too.. He would have loved seeing this link.. A lot of hams around Boston were WW2-vet/Raytheon-type MIT-niks..I see remnants of their shacks in basements in the burbs NW of Boston where they all worked.. ..

Download Attachment: icon_photo.gif K1AWP.jpg

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