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I've always had problems with the caulking the tub to the tile thing. This time around it was staying too wet. It wouldn't dry out. So I dug it out and stuffed backer rod to within a 1/16th of an inch of the opening. Put down fresh coat of water based sanded caulk. It split horizontally. Spoke with mfg and they said just add more on top? I let it dry 3 plus days with a dehumidifier. It's still soft along the back front corner and down the side towards the back. It's also pulling off and crumbling a bit. WHAT THE HECK AM I DOING WRONG WITH THIS STUFF? [:-paperba

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I've always had problems with the caulking the tub to the tile thing. This time around it was staying to wet. It wouldn't dry out. So I dug it out and stuffed backer rod to within a 1/16th of an inch of the opening. Put down fresh coat of water based sanded caulk. It split horizontally. Spoke with mfg and they said just add more on top? I let it dry 3 plus days with a dehumidifier. It's still soft along the back front corner and down the side towards the back. It's also pulling off and crumbling a bit. WHAT THE HECK AM I DOING WRONG WITH THIS STUFF? [:-paperba

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I don't know why it's behaving like that. Are you using some kind of cheezy store-brand product?

My patented method:

Thoroughly clean the joint with acetone to remove all impurities.

Use painter's masking tape to mask off each side of the caulk seam and thoroughly burnish the edges of the tape for a razor-sharp finished caulk line.

Fill the tub with water. If there's any tendency for the tub to shift downward when filled, this will ensure that the tub is in its lowest position.

Caulk the joint with a quality product, like Polyseamseal. Apply it all in one go. Tool the joint smooth with your wet finger.

Immediately pull off the masking tape, being careful not to bung up the caulk line.

Leave the tub full of water till the caulk sets, which should happen in a day.

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You should also learn to push the caulk gun instead of pulling it toward you and drawing the caulk with it.

I learned that trick from a carpenter from Bosnia. He was so good at it, there was no need (for him) to tool it after. The tip tooled it as he went. I'm not as good at it as he is, but it saves time and waste of material, it ensures the gap is filled, and it works.

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The caulk may be reacting with the glue used to adhere the surround panels. Use only quality caulk designed for use with the panels.

Properly applied, caulk requires no tooling. The push technique takes practice. Also keep in mind caulk shrinks as it cures.

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The caulk may be reacting with the glue used to adhere the surround panels. Use only quality caulk designed for use with the panels.

Properly applied, caulk requires no tooling. The push technique takes practice. Also keep in mind caulk shrinks as it cures.

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Looks good. Time will tell. My own experience is...it's caulk, it always gets some funk in it sooner or later.

The "push" method is a learned experience; going around corners is easier than the "pull" method; you ease up on the trigger, then kind of do a little pirouette in the corner, then go off down the new line. Done right, there's usually just a teeny little bulge that you touch off with a wet finger.

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