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Moisture Meter Cross Reference Chart


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Someone had sent me a cross reference chart for moisture meter readings for some of the top brands a couple of years ago. Such as, what would a 6% moisture reading on a Protimeter Meter be on a Tramex or a Wagner Meter. My laptop crashed and I lost it. Any help appreciated.

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I have the Surveymaster and a Tramex piece. It would be nice to be able to see the numbers between the two. I've looked everywhere for some kind of explanation on what the numbers actually mean on the GE piece. I could be wrong, but I just assumed it was a 3 digit such as 12.8%.

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I have the Surveymaster and a Tramex piece. It would be nice to be able to see the numbers between the two. I've looked everywhere for some kind of explanation on what the numbers actually mean on the GE piece. I could be wrong, but I just assumed it was a 3 digit such as 12.8%.

The readings on the various meter are relative to that meter. I have found that in EW work it has been best to report moisture as Low, Medium or High. When I'm asked to define what the levels are I use the following:

Low is anything under 12%

Med is between 13% to 24%

High is anything over 25% (at this level you can usually see the moisture)

I also add that moisture and fungal problems are seen more readily once the moisture reaches the Med level.

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I have the Surveymaster and a Tramex piece. It would be nice to be able to see the numbers between the two. I've looked everywhere for some kind of explanation on what the numbers actually mean on the GE piece. I could be wrong, but I just assumed it was a 3 digit such as 12.8%.

Are you talking about REL or %WME mode on the Surveymaster? If the latter, you are getting a direct readout of moisture content in percent, assuming use of the species correction chart. The REL mode is not intended to give a percentage, just a reading relative to other areas of the same material.

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The readings on the various meter are relative to that meter. I have found that in EW work it has been best to report moisture as Low, Medium or High. When I'm asked to define what the levels are I use the following:

Low is anything under 12%

Med is between 13% to 24%

High is anything over 25% (at this level you can usually see the moisture)

I also add that moisture and fungal problems are seen more readily once the moisture reaches the Med level.

I call....

Low <13-14%

Med >15-19%

Problematic/Mold/Damage >20%

The guys around here tend to lock on 20% as the level where problems start, so that's what I do.

Is that "too low"? Is 25% a better call for problems?

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With these problem percentages... are we talking % wood moisture content with a pin meter? Pinless readings in wood? Pinless readings in other stuff?

In my experience, around here, stabbing framing lumber in crawl spaces... if it hasn't dried to maybe 16% or less, there is an elevated moisture issue. Around 20% and there's funk, or there's gonna be.

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The readings on the various meter are relative to that meter. I have found that in EW work it has been best to report moisture as Low, Medium or High. When I'm asked to define what the levels are I use the following:

Low is anything under 12%

Med is between 13% to 24%

High is anything over 25% (at this level you can usually see the moisture)

I also add that moisture and fungal problems are seen more readily once the moisture reaches the Med level.

I call....

Low <13-14%

Med >15-19%

Problematic/Mold/Damage >20%

The guys around here tend to lock on 20% as the level where problems start, so that's what I do.

Is that "too low"? Is 25% a better call for problems?

I think I got the numbers from Ron Huffman or Dennis Rose about 15 years ago. 25% is really more of a easier number to recall, I think that is why so many folks use it. I would also bet that the various meters will have at least a 2% to 3% margin of error.

Pretty much anything over 25% is going to be saturated with moisture. Damage/rot really gets cooking around 15% at 20% it is a mold rot buffet!

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With these problem percentages... are we talking % wood moisture content with a pin meter? Pinless readings in wood? Pinless readings in other stuff?

In my experience, around here, stabbing framing lumber in crawl spaces... if it hasn't dried to maybe 16% or less, there is an elevated moisture issue. Around 20% and there's funk, or there's gonna be.

It is relative moisture. In my area if you put the pins of a Survey Master into drywall of a garage that is open in the middle of August I bet you will get readings in the 10% to 16% range. It is due to the humidity in the air and is not really a problem since you have so much air flow and it is not constant. Same goes for most framing in a crawlspace. On reason the we want to see treated lumber in contact with concrete or the ground.

Now in a vacant home that is closed up and is allowed to fester that same 15% RM level in the drywall will become a mold farm in about 30 days!

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With these problem percentages... are we talking % wood moisture content with a pin meter? Pinless readings in wood? Pinless readings in other stuff?

In my experience, around here, stabbing framing lumber in crawl spaces... if it hasn't dried to maybe 16% or less, there is an elevated moisture issue. Around 20% and there's funk, or there's gonna be.

It is relative moisture. In my area if you put the pins of a Survey Master into drywall of a garage that is open in the middle of August I bet you will get readings in the 10% to 16% range. It is due to the humidity in the air and is not really a problem since you have so much air flow and it is not constant. Same goes for most framing in a crawlspace. On reason the we want to see treated lumber in contact with concrete or the ground.

Now in a vacant home that is closed up and is allowed to fester that same 15% RM level in the drywall will become a mold farm in about 30 days!

Yes to that, relative moisture. But also the material or the medium for mould to grow on. Wallpaper or wood with linseed oil on it will grow mold before painted wood will.

This old radio cabinet has been out in my unheated shed all winter, in a cardboard box. The Surveymaster measures 20.2 inside and 17.4 around the grill. Mold is starting to grow on the dust on the inner edges of the grill openings. I've wiped most of it off in the picture. But the interior of the cabinet is relatively dust-free, not moldy, even with a slightly higher moisture reading. Now if I'd left an orange in there, oh boy, it would be a green mess.

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