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Reductions in DWV


Chris Bernhardt
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To my understanding no reductions are allowed in DW lines as this constitutes and impediment to flow and a potential build up to obstruction. I just want to confirm it however. for example I will once in a while see 1.5" galvanized kitchen, laundry or shower lines etc. replaced with 2" ABS but then reduced to 1.5" at the original gal or cast plumbing.

I think the applicable Oregon code is P2611.5. I have written these up for further eval by a licensed plumber but sometimes they come back and say its OK. Its not OK for new construction so why should it be OK on a repair. Doing it right would mean the replacement up to the nearest 2" or greater line which would be double the cost typically in a crawlspace and sometimes even more for example in a basement.

What say yee?

Chris, Oregon

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Originally posted by Chris Bernhardt

I have written these up for further eval by a licensed plumber but sometimes they come back and say its OK. Its not OK for new construction so why should it be OK on a repair. Doing it right would mean the replacement up to the nearest 2" or greater line which would be double the cost typically in a crawlspace and sometimes even more for example in a basement.

What say yee?

Chris, Oregon

I say the plumber that approved it gets most of his work from realtors.

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Originally posted by Chris Bernhardt

To my understanding no reductions are allowed in DW lines as this constitutes and impediment to flow and a potential build up to obstruction. I just want to confirm it however. for example I will once in a while see 1.5" galvanized kitchen, laundry or shower lines etc. replaced with 2" ABS but then reduced to 1.5" at the original gal or cast plumbing.

I think the applicable Oregon code is P2611.5. I have written these up for further eval by a licensed plumber but sometimes they come back and say its OK.

That's what you get for recommending further evaluation. Recommend repair instead. Don't ask him for his opinion.

Its not OK for new construction so why should it be OK on a repair. Doing it right would mean the replacement up to the nearest 2" or greater line which would be double the cost typically in a crawlspace and sometimes even more for example in a basement.

What say yee?

Chris, Oregon

I'm not sure what you mean by "double the cost."

- Jim Katen, Oregon

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Originally posted by Jim Katen

Originally posted by Chris Bernhardt

That's what you get for recommending further evaluation. Recommend repair instead. Don't ask him for his opinion.

- Jim Katen, Oregon

That's a very good point.

This whole "further evaluation" thing is an invitation to confusion. Heck, we sit around & trash contractors for doing lousy work, and then we recommend that the same folks come out & "evalutate" something we know is wrong.

Katen has been saying this for years. Just tell people to repair things. It makes life easier, & keeps one in the position of providing professional excellent advice.

The stale "recommend further evaluation" makes us look foolish & unknowledgeable.

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This I time I wrote it up for correction. Having been spending a lot of time here on TIJ I have been doing a lot of reforming having grown up in a vaccum. I am sick and tired of writing things up for further evaluation to only have the contractor say it doesn't need to be done. I am sick and tired of the home owner or his relative doing a dumbass repair. I have all that language about having the work done by a qualified so and so but it doesn't seem to make any difference.

More and more I just say the thing is in need of repair or recommend repair. I don't say it should be, could be, would be. The thing either needs repair or it doesn't. I have done so out of frustration from call backs concerning my dumbass advice as Jim would say because I was not being clear or definitive.

I also will outline in some cases a preferred repair even in somewhat detail when my gut tells me the seller's pet fish is going to do the repair. Anybody here can become a licensed contractor with very little effort but that does't make them qualified. All the time all I ever hear is "the repair was done by a licensed contractor" uh who happens know nothing about building codes, industry standards and can't even read the manufacturer's installation instructions.

What I meant by double the cost was a generalization and I was referring to where the person doing the repair replaced half of the line because the rest looked OK in thier opinion when the whole line should have been replaced.

Chris, Oregon

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