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Changes are coming


Darren
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Originally posted by Darren

3) When the joists are parallel to the foundation wall, solid blocking is required every 4 feet along the joists, at least 4 feet out from the foundation wall. The nailing pattern includes at least 6 10d nails down thru the floor deck into each block.

I don't know what changes NJ has made, but the paragraph above won't meet the requirements of the IRC. The blocking needs to be 24" on center (not every 4 feet - check footnote "a" of table 404.1(1)).

Also, this blocking has to be full-depth for the first two joist spaces, then flat blocked with 2x4 (or larger) blocks for the rest of the way across the floor. Four feet out doesn't cut it.

Where did the requirement for 6 10d nails come from? I don't see that one.

- Jim Katen, Oregon

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Originally posted by Darren

"Where did the requirement for 6 10d nails come from? I don't see that one. "

The blocking I described is from the Superior Wall installation booklet.

Pages 28 & 29 (figures 18 & 19) describe the nailing.

Darren

I've heard of Superior Wall but I've never seen their product. My hunch is that they're an eastern thing.

Since they're an engineered system, they don't have to comply with the prescriptive requirements of the code.

- Jim Katen, Oregon

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Darren,

I was talking to a municipal guy (AHJ) today to find out if requirements will change for railings. He mentioned something about changes, let out a big sigh, and said "I'm not allowed to talk about any changes". He didn't seem happy about what's to come, for some reason.

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Jim:

Here's a link http://www.superiorwalls.com/

it's a very good product once you get past how thin the wall actually is (2 inches).

It's a much faster system (no footings are needed, the panel set on 3/4 inch clean stone);

dig the basement, stone and add drainage (2 days); set panels (1 day), on the fourth day you can start to install your deck.

Neal; I haven't heard about any changes to the rail or stair system.

One change that is approved is a garage (or other low hazard to human life structure) that is less than 600 sq ft (light framed construction) and has an eave height of 10 feet or less do not have to have footings extend below the frost line.

Darren

www.aboutthehouseinspections.com

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Originally posted by StevenT

Does this mean that metal joist cross straps are no good?

No good for what?

They certainly won't meet the requirement for blocking joists parallel to a foundation wall. The purpose of the blocking is to resist the lateral force at the top of the wall.

- Jim Katen, Oregon

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Originally posted by Darren

Jim:

Here's a link http://www.superiorwalls.com/

it's a very good product once you get past how thin the wall actually is (2 inches).

It's a much faster system (no footings are needed, the panel set on 3/4 inch clean stone);

dig the basement, stone and add drainage (2 days); set panels (1 day), on the fourth day you can start to install your deck.

Neal; I haven't heard about any changes to the rail or stair system.

One change that is approved is a garage (or other low hazard to human life structure) that is less than 600 sq ft (light framed construction) and has an eave height of 10 feet or less do not have to have footings extend below the frost line.

Darren

www.aboutthehouseinspections.com

Darren,

The concept and engineering of the system are good but my experience is that the implementation history is not so good. I have seen lots of problems on the few that I inspected.

It is a good product for pre-fabricated housing.

For stick built, the system does not easily allow for any field changes.

I still like CMU or concrete foundations better.

On another subject regarding changes, NJ has updated the Perscriptive Energy Package requirements (NJ-U.C.C. FTO-07-02) and it seems R-19 (2 x 6) exterior walls are needed in most cases if you want to use these charts instead of Res-Check.

Steve

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Steve;

According to the bulletin, you can use 2x4 if you have insulating sheathing that has an R-6.

I would think that would be the way most builder will go otherwise not only would the cost go up due to 2x6's but what about the window sills & extensions, etc.

I'm not a Superior wall salesman or anything, but they make an insulated panel that would meet the basement insulation requirements.

I don't know if you do work near the shore, they changed the wind designation; basically anything east of the Turnpike cannot use the IRC wind design, it must be engineered.

The next year should prove 'interesting'; confusion should run wild.

Darren

www.aboutthehouseinspections.com

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We have been using Res Check instead. It allows for more options.

We do some work near the shore but not too much.

The local inspectors are a moving target when it comes to compliance and enforcement on many things. We have a State Building Code but it is enforced differently in every municipality. Sometimes I think it depends on which seminar they went to last.

You are right, this coming year will be interesting.

Regards,

Steve

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