Jump to content

Deck guardrails


Chris Bernhardt
 Share

Recommended Posts

Is anyone writing up lag bolted and bolted thru guardrails lacking the simpson tiedown in light of the tests done a Virginia tech a couple of years ago?

My take on the testing was that an HI can't judge just by stressing the guard rail as the failure is non-linear.

Given the testing results aren't we liable for not pointing out that lag bolted and even bolted thru connections are likely to fail?

Chris, Oregon

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Speaking only for myself, I can't go anything like that far yet. If I did I would have to automatically write up every deck I see. Frankly I think it's an exaggeration to say that most other connections are likely to fail, test results or no. Most never fail, if only because most are never really tried under extreme stresses. I see some crummy railings and I write them up without mercy, but I also see some damn stout ones that I'm perfectly comfortable blessing (or sitting on, or leaning against). For now I'm sticking with that approach.

I did just get a nice new publication from Simpson, and I love their stuff.

Brian G.

Bart Makes Great Hardware [:P]

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Originally posted by Chris Bernhardt

Is anyone writing up lag bolted and bolted thru guardrails lacking the simpson tiedown in light of the tests done a Virginia tech a couple of years ago?

No. The pocket protector crowd doesn't particularly impress me on this topic.

My take on the testing was that an HI can't judge just by stressing the guard rail as the failure is non-linear.

I don't see or hear about enough railing failures to justify the concern. I find ledger flashings and connections to be a much more pressing concern.

Given the testing results aren't we liable for not pointing out that lag bolted and even bolted thru connections are likely to fail?

I doubt it. When lag screws and through bolts cease to be standard methods that the AJH's bless and even show in their documents, then I might change my mind.

- Jim Katen, Oregon

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Originally posted by Chris Bernhardt

Is anyone writing up lag bolted and bolted thru guardrails lacking the simpson tiedown in light of the tests done a Virginia tech a couple of years ago?

My take on the testing was that an HI can't judge just by stressing the guard rail as the failure is non-linear.

Given the testing results aren't we liable for not pointing out that lag bolted and even bolted thru connections are likely to fail?

Chris, Oregon

Never heard a word about this. Now was this study paid for by Simpson or was it paid for by the VA Tech?

Lag screws and bolts seem to work fine and just about every single one will out last the wood.

I'm with Jim on the flashing. It is a fight every time I bring it up and that is about 90% of the time!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Originally posted by Scottpat

Never heard a word about this. Now was this study paid for by Simpson or was it paid for by the VA Tech?

Tsk, Scott, Scott, Scott, what am I going to do with you, Bro? [:-banghea

It's all right here on TIJ the most jim-dandiest place to be for all home inspectors, don't you know! [:-party]

ONE TEAM - ONE FIGHT!!!

Mike

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Originally posted by hausdok

It's all right here on TIJ the most jim-dandiest place to be for all home inspectors, don't you know! [:-party]

ONE TEAM - ONE FIGHT!!!

Mike

Having re-read the article, I'm even more hesitant to criticize bolted rail connections. Their rails failed when they applied a 200# load PLUS a 2.5 safety factor. This safety factor isn't mentioned in the IRC. Heck, sure they failed at 500 pounds.

- Jim Katen, Oregon

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I was thinking about this today. I can't ever recall seeing thru-bolts fail in railings in the real world. The most common safety issue I find with guard rails is not being tall enough, followed openings that are too big to hold little people.

Brian G.

Rails At Mid-Thigh High....No Good [xx(]

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Originally posted by Brian G.

I was thinking about this today. I can't ever recall seeing thru-bolts fail in railings in the real world. The most common safety issue I find with guard rails is not being tall enough, followed openings that are too big to hold little people.

Brian G.

Rails At Mid-Thigh High....No Good [xx(]

It isn't the bolts that are the problem, it's the fact that the rails are usually connected to poorly braced rim joists. When the geeks from VA Tech applied a 500# load to them, either the rim twisted apart of the bolts pulled through.

- Jim Katen, Oregon

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Originally posted by Jim Katen

It isn't the bolts that are the problem, it's the fact that the rails are usually connected to poorly braced rim joists. When the geeks from VA Tech applied a 500# load to them, either the rim twisted apart of the bolts pulled through.

I've never seen that happen in the real world either. All of the shaky/scary rails I see are due to poor fastening, idiotic design, or totally inappropriate materials being used. About half are just nailed on. I'm sure the mileage varies elsewhere.

Brian G.

500 Pound People Shouldn't Be on a Deck to Start With...Try an Exercise Bike [:-bigeyes

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...