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Meter jumpers


homnspector
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Would you call this out? These jumpers look to be #6 solid copper, flattened and bent to jump the meter socket (meter was installed in a different location). 200 amp main breaker.

Obviously, the #6 is smaller than the service conductors (not visible) and would represent a weak link, or would they handle 200 amps since they are so short?

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Originally posted by homnspector

Would you call this out? These jumpers look to be #6 solid copper, flattened and bent to jump the meter socket (meter was installed in a different location). 200 amp main breaker.

Obviously, the #6 is smaller than the service conductors (not visible) and would represent a weak link, or would they handle 200 amps since they are so short?

I don't believe that length has anything to do with it. The ampacity tables are based on the type of insulation covering the wires and the ambient conditions around them. For instance, Table 310.21 is for bare copper wire in free air up to 104 degrees with a 2 ft/sec breeze. In that case, #6 copper has an ampacity of 124 amps.

There's no ampacity table for copper wire covered with electrician's tape inside a meter can. However, since these things are located upstream of the meter, they're the power company's responsibility and the power company has their own rules that are different from the NEC.

I'd probably send that picture to the power company and ask them what's up.

- Jim Katen, Oregon

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Originally posted by chicago

How do you know upstream?

I don't. The copper bars look as if they're pre-manufactured though. Look at how smoothly the flattened sections flare out. I suspect that these are pre-manufactured and that they were installed by the power company.

If it's downstream, I expect that Fritz will tell us.

- Jim Katen, Oregon

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It is downstream. It is part of a group of vacation rental units. At some point they decided to move all of the meters to a central location.

I agree they look manufactured (except for the electrical tape). They are in every unit and all look to be the same size and shape.

Jim, wouldn't the resistance in the conductor increase with length, and conversely decrease the shorter the conductor?

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