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moving blown in fiberglass


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Anyone know of a good way to move a lot of blown in fiberglass insulation? I recently moved and have pull down attic access but no flooring. What I thought about doing is removing the blown in where I want to floor, add R-38 under the floored area and moving the blown in elsewhere. The elsewheres are not easily accessible though. Thought about rigging my shop vac to suck it up and blow it out the tube. Anyone try this or something else?

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Anyone know of a good way to move a lot of blown in fiberglass insulation? I recently moved and have pull down attic access but no flooring. What I thought about doing is removing the blown in where I want to floor, add R-38 under the floored area and moving the blown in elsewhere. The elsewheres are not easily accessible though. Thought about rigging my shop vac to suck it up and blow it out the tube. Anyone try this or something else?

Just sweep it out of the way. Mound it up in the areas where you're not going to put the floor.

- Jim Katen, Oregon

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Anyone know of a good way to move a lot of blown in fiberglass insulation? I recently moved and have pull down attic access but no flooring. What I thought about doing is removing the blown in where I want to floor, add R-38 under the floored area and moving the blown in elsewhere. The elsewheres are not easily accessible though. Thought about rigging my shop vac to suck it up and blow it out the tube. Anyone try this or something else?

Just sweep it out of the way. Mound it up in the areas where you're not going to put the floor.

Yes, but I am trying to take the excess over to another part of the attic that is not easy to get into - no floor and very low. Thought I might be able to blow it that way somehow. I always make things complicated so maybe I'll just pile up next to the floored areas and leave it be.

- Jim Katen, Oregon

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Hi,

Is the roof of that house stick-framed with real ceiling joists or are there manufactured trusses where the bottom chords are being used as ceiling joists. If the latter, I'd think twice about putting a floor in there and then placing a lot of weight on that lower chord unless you plan to add some joists so there isn't weight actually bearing on the truss chord.

If there's blown-in in those "tight" areas there's probably a way to get in there. Look for an area just large enough to squeeze through. It's usually the case around here that one has to literally move the insulation aside and then lower one's body between joists nearly to the ceiling and do a yoga-like move to get into those. They're a real pain - literally - getting in and getting out. You don't want to shoot it blind into those areas because you're liable to screw up the ventilation.

How are you going to make up for the reduced R-value in the area you remove the insulation from; use custom-cut R-7 foam panels installed against the ceiling and stacked?

ONE TEAM - ONE FIGHT!!!

Mike

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