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CPSC makes recommendation-Chinese drywall


Marc
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I haven't been able to confirm it yet at the CPSC site but this was in the local newspaper this am. I know that some of us don't trust the CPSC but I would use this excuse as reason to write up a recommendation to gut the house wherever chinese drywall, and evidence of damage from such, is found.

It's about time.

Marc

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Hi Marc!

It does help to find support for making a drastic recommendation when necessary. And, I’m sure there certainly are specific situations where the damage is so serious that gutting the structure is necessary. Under those circumstances, it would be good to point to the CPSC as a source.

But at the same time, I would suggest caution when putting too much faith in the CPSC which really took a hit to its credibility with the implementation of the Consumer Product Safety Improvements Act (15 U.S.C. §§ 2051#8722;2089). The CPSIA banned ATVs for youths because there was lead in the handlebars! The CPSC concluded in an official statement that ATVs were dangerous for youths to ride because it would expose them to lead!

So, one’s own credibility (and liability) still lay with professional discretion and judging each case on its own merits.

Cheers!

Caoimhín P. Connell

Forensic Industrial Hygienist

www.forensic-applications.com

(The opinions expressed here are exclusively my personal opinions and do not necessarily reflect my professional opinion, opinion of my employer, agency, peers, or professional affiliates. The above post is for information only and does not reflect professional advice and is not intended to supercede the professional advice of others.)

AMDG

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But at the same time, I would suggest caution when putting too much faith in the CPSC which really took a hit to its credibility with the implementation of the Consumer Product Safety Improvements Act (15 U.S.C. §§ 2051#8722;2089). The CPSIA banned ATVs for youths because there was lead in the handlebars! The CPSC concluded in an official statement that ATVs were dangerous for youths to ride because it would expose them to lead!

Perhaps in an effort to close the loop holes that allows China to import toxic items, much like Chinese drywall into America, this was one of those things that got caught up in the bureaucracy. In the not too distant past there was a major problem with China exporting toys, containing lead paint, into America New York Times. I think we are all in agreement that China has little regard for the well being of their population (and ours). Cheap rules no matter what the cost.

Now, when you say it fast, and take it a wee bit out of context as "The CPSC tried to ban ATVs because the handlebars contained lead!!" it sounds like the "government is at it again" but perhaps it went deeper than that. Maybe, just maybe, it's good legislation, that wants to stop our children being poisoned with toys, with known dangerous substances such as lead, being imported from China. Maybe it's one of those things that got caught up in the paperwork but none the less afforded food for the "I hate the United States Government, don't you?" population.

In the end I fully agree, it is idiotic to ban ATVs based on lead in the handlebars. Actually, in the end, it's irresponsible parents that pose the biggest threat to the safety of their children with regards to ATVs.

Cheers!

Terence

My opinions are my opinions and are expressed as strictly my opinions. Any use of my opinions, as your opinions, are strictly forbidden as they are my opinions and not your opinions. If you should try and use these opinions as your opinions you should delete yourself immediately

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Hello Terence-

That’s a good point, and I think you are correct. Thanks for clarifying the point.

Cheers!

Caoimhín P. Connell

Forensic Industrial Hygienist

www.forensic-applications.com

(The opinions expressed here are exclusively my personal opinions and do not necessarily reflect my professional opinion, opinion of my employer, agency, peers, or professional affiliates. The above post is for information only and does not reflect professional advice and is not intended to supercede the professional advice of others.)

AMDG

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Hello Terence-

That’s a good point, and I think you are correct. Thanks for clarifying the point.

Cheers!

Caoimhín P. Connell

Forensic Industrial Hygienist

www.forensic-applications.com

(The opinions expressed here are exclusively my personal opinions and do not necessarily reflect my professional opinion, opinion of my employer, agency, peers, or professional affiliates. The above post is for information only and does not reflect professional advice and is not intended to supercede the professional advice of others.)

AMDG

No problem, I'm here to help [;)].

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The problem is that net is never cast in the right direction, it's always reactive, never proactive. It doesn't matter what we need protection from; we'll find a better poison, new uses for the old ones, or a cheaper source.

Lumber that leached arsenic was replaced with wood that's caustic and corrosive, urea formaldehyde in everything from adhesives to insulation to carpeting, the current Chinese drywall mess, and lead - don't even get me started on lead.

Tom

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