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PEX


Chad Fabry
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I'm remodeling my bath, adding a bath and at the same time cleaning up a hodge podge of bad plumbing that's been perpetrated against my home over the last 170 years.

I'm seriously considering PEX for materials, mainly because it'll be a lot easier to install than copper in exisiting construction, and because I like the way the manifolds look when neatly plumbed.

Any of you have bad things to say about PEX?

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Chad,

I actually love it! The only downside is that it has not been in the field for more than 10-20 years. The reasons why I like it:

Does not corrode

Much easier to install than copper (provided you have a clue)

Not installed under slab (like copper is here)

Cheaper than copper

No pin hole leaks

While not freeze proof, it's less likely to burst than copper

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Originally posted by chrisprickett

Much easier to install than copper (provided you have a clue)

Not installed under slab (like copper is here)

Cheaper than copper

No pin hole leaks

While not freeze proof, it's less likely to burst than copper

Nyah, see...take that Copper! Nyah. [:-masked]

Brian the Hammer(-upper)

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Hi,

I agree with much of what Chris says. PEX has been around in Europe for 3 decades and a couple here without any serious issues. The biggest problem I see are plumbers who go out and get certified by the manufacturers to install the stuff and then immediately toss out whatever rules will allow them to save money on the install.

For instance, in a brand new house I looked at yesterday which is plumbed with Wirspo Aquapex, I noticed that the stub outs seemed to be pretty loose, almost as if unsupported behind the wall. So, when I got done with the inspection, I walked to one of the neighboring houses in the same development and walked through to see how it's been plumbed. I found that the plumber hadn't allowed any extra length in the form of a side to side run in wall cavities or expansion loops as required by the manufacturer, and, that where the pipe stubs out of walls he didn't use either talons and support plates or Propex drop-ear elbows. To save a few bucks on each install, he omitted the expansion material and used the cheaper common pro-pex elbows instead of the drop-ear elbows and then fastened the Pex to a nearby stud with the plastic pipe clips.

So basically, this guy blew off the manufacturer. If/when the install fails a few years down the road, it won't be the plumber that everyone will be blaming, because he'll be pointing his finger at Wirsbo and telling everyone how he'll never use their piece of crap product again.

The muni guy should have caught these issues. Trouble there is that the muni guy probably hasn't got a clue how Pex is supposed to be installed.

We've got to get better control systems in place for construction. There's no ifs ands or buts about it.

ONE TEAM - ONE FIGHT!!!

Mike

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IMO the home inspection profession will be instrumental in effecting that change, not the AHJ. Education and proper certification/ credentialing in the IRC or whatever code is adopted in your area is imperative to this forward leap for our profession. I truly believe we have a golden opportunity to take the lead in this aspect and will be light years ahead of the AHJ. No disrespect toward them intended, but, IMO a properly motivated and educated HI will always outperform his government paid counterpart for one major reason. His personal a$$ets are on the line.

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Hey Kurt...I was talking to my brother-in-law who is a plumber, and he was wondering if Cook, Dupage, or the surrounding counties even allowed plastic instead of copper. He never heard of Pex before I mentioned it to him. He would love to work with it instead of copper! Any thoughts?

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Originally posted by crusty

One word, union. I was doing work in the New York City area in the late 80's and they still required cast iron drain lines with poured lead joints. Nothing like quintupling the labor cost.

Hell, we didn't get PVC until 1992. I still have my lead pot, & can caulk & lead a joint in 4" cast. I can sweat 3" copper as sweet as it gets. We even had pure lead water service lines until the early '90's.

Still can't use NMC/romex.

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  • 2 years later...

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