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Double Tap on Main Breaker?


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I do know that the pictures shows a 200 amp main that is double tapped, the question is; Would of/Could of this been allowed when the house was built in 1978? As this is in an incorporated city with a Building Dept, I would think that it was inspected and approved back then. But, thinking and knowing are two different things. The owner is calling the city tomorrow to see if there are records.

The main breaker enclosure is outside,next to the meter and there are two sub panels inside. Both subs have separate buses for commons and grounds and the commons are isolated. No double taps in the subs and neatly done for small GE 100 amp boxes.

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I inspected the house for the owner that wants to put in on the market in the spring and doesn't want issues to come up that might slow down a sale.

Nothing better to do this late in the night, so I thought I might exercise my and your mind with a question.

Thanks

Ezra Malernee

Canton, Ohio

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I do know that the pictures shows a 200 amp main that is double tapped, the question is; Would of/Could of this been allowed when the house was built in 1978?

It's highly unlikely. The terminals on that breaker would have to have been approved for more than one conductor.

From the 1975 NEC, Article 110.14(a) . . . Terminals for more than one conductor and terminals used to connect aluminum shall be of a type approved for the purpose.

I've got a 200-amp GE breaker from that time period and I can't find any indication anywhere on it that it's approved to serve two conductors.

It's easy to fix with some wire & split bolts.

- Jim Katen, Oregon

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Each of those conductors should be rated for 200 amps, regardless of the size of the sub, though I'm sure you already know that.

Marc

Although the double conductors in the lug is improper, there are tap rules that would allow for smaller conductors than would be needed. The OCPD would be at the other end of those conductors. The conductors that are tapped would not have to be 200 amp rated.

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