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Kitchen outlets


DonTx
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As I read it, NEC 210.52 (B) says that Kitchen, dining rooms are required to be on 2 20 amp circuits. Correct?

Also, if the disposal and dishwasher are served by the same outlet, doesn't the top and bottom receptacle have to be on separate breakers trip tied together or can one breaker serve the entire outlet?

The new home I did this morning has me really scratching my head over this and other things I saw.

Thanks,

Donald

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Originally posted by Donald Lawson

As I read it, NEC 210.52 (B) says that Kitchen, dining rooms are required to be on 2 20 amp circuits. Correct?

Also, if the disposal and dishwasher are served by the same outlet, doesn't the top and bottom receptacle have to be on separate breakers trip tied together or can one breaker serve the entire outlet?

The new home I did this morning has me really scratching my head over this and other things I saw.

Hi Donald,

Apparently, Douglas isn't available right now to comment, but I'll quote his book instead.

From Electrical Inspection of Existing Dwellings:

Dishwashers and disposers are not specifically prohibited from sharing the same circuit. However, if they share a circuit they could easily exceed the rating of a 15 or 20 amp circuit, and there is a 6 amp limit to the size of the largest motor [430-53a]. The practical affect of these rules is that most jurisdictions require individual circuits for these appliances. The ratings of the appliances can usually be found by reading the label on the edge of the dishwasher door and on the disposer nameplate. If a kilowatt number is given, you multiply by 1000 and divide by the voltage(usually 120) to arrive at the amperage draw of the appliance.

So, I guess the bottom line is what the local jurisdiction allows, and then if it's permitted the largest motor can't exceed 6 amps and the combined load can't exceed the rating of the circuit.

ONE TEAM - ONE FIGHT!!!

Mike

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Originally posted by Donald Lawson

As I read it, NEC 210.52 (B) says that Kitchen, dining rooms are required to be on 2 20 amp circuits. Correct?

Correct

Also, if the disposal and dishwasher are served by the same outlet, doesn't the top and bottom receptacle have to be on separate breakers trip tied together or can one breaker serve the entire outlet?

Mike answered the first part of the question, I'll attempt the other parts

1. The two circuits do not include the dishwasher and disposal circuits.

2. The breaker handles are tied together when two circuits share a neutral & share the same yolk. A dish/disposal split outlet with two breakers may share the neutral but if it does then the handles need to be tied together.

This is so that you don't turn off the disposal circuit and then take the outlet out and get a perm from the dishwasher circuit.[:-jump]

I hope that helps.

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  • 5 years later...

I would disagree, they have everything to do with the dining room. Small appliance circuits can serve receptacles in a dining room, pantry, and breakfast room. NEC 210.52(B)(1). Pretty old original post (2004), but information is a good reminder.

BTW, an NEC Handbook explains in better detail than the NEC itself. It even has pictures!! I'm a visual learner myself.

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