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Another veneer masterpiece


gtblum
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I envy you guys who live in bigger towns where everyone doesn't know everyone. I think the shit's gonna hit the fan here. This wall is about two years old.

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I was able to remove some of the loose stone from the bottom in the last pic. The sheathing was rotten under the WRB.

How bad do we hate the detail around the windows?

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This was my special find yesterday on a lick and stick faux stone veneer.

New home with the folks closing on the property in a couple of days! Builder is not happy with me for pointing it out; looks like the buyer has delayed closing untill it is corrected and I don't think it is going to be an easy fix...

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This was my special find yesterday on a lick and stick faux stone veneer.

New home with the folks closing on the property in a couple of days! Builder is not happy with me for pointing it out; looks like the buyer has delayed closing untill it is corrected and I don't think it is going to be an easy fix...

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For the life of me, I just can't figure how the builder could have erred so badly as to do this. It looks deliberate, though I know it can't be. Or is it?

Marc

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This was my special find yesterday on a lick and stick faux stone veneer.

New home with the folks closing on the property in a couple of days! Builder is not happy with me for pointing it out; looks like the buyer has delayed closing untill it is corrected and I don't think it is going to be an easy fix...

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The builder was actually pissed at you? Now that's hilarious.

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C'mon John. YOU know it's our fault for pointing out, not the fault of the poor contractor who screwed it up in the first place.

After all, it's only a problem BECAUSE we pointed it out.

Wouldn't be a problem if we'd just keep our mouth shut!

(oh where oh where are those sarcasm emoticons.)

-

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I do agree.

The faux stone is going to make the EIFS problem look like a drop in the bucket.

This is another barrier cladding without a drainage plane. I have several homes under consult right now that are exhibiting major problems.

Actually faux stone is not a barrier cladding. It should be installed similar to how stucco is applied, with a WRB and lath that it is attached on to.

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I could be wrong, but I think that Mark is referring to the fact that the homes that he's consulting on weren't done to current MVMA guidelines with drainage details incorporated into the veneer.

I write these up almost daily. Builders don't seem to care. They are resistant to placing a weep screed and a two-inch gap below this stuff; and they don't like to flash it to MVMA guidelines or stop it at a termination bead, leave a gap between it and wood surrounding it and fill that gap with a backer rod and flexible sealant because of esthetics.

It's fake stone that's supposed to provide the illusion that it's actually doing something other than hanging in the air and they want it to look like it's supporting something. When you stick a two-inch gap under it the illusion that it's structural disappears and then buyers ask, "What the hell?" 'cuz they don't understand why the drainage details are needed. On homes where the stuff has been detailed correctly, I've had buyers ask if I think it will be possible for the builder to "fix" the veneer by eliminating the gaps below it and removing the "tin" and the "rubbery stuff" around it.

If manufacturers of this product were smart, they'd start manufacturing base and perimeter courses that would conceal the flashings and goop and would have porous/slotted pieces at the bottom that could be applied all the way to the ground but still drain.

ONE TEAM - ONE FIGHT!!!

Mike

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If manufacturers of this product were smart, they'd start manufacturing base and perimeter courses that would conceal the flashings and goop and would have porous/slotted pieces at the bottom that could be applied all the way to the ground but still drain.

There is the option of installing through wall flashing and weeps, and then extending it to the ground. I've just never seen it done. Also, I've seen sealant that nearly matches the mortar.

Flashing could be hidden along the top, just like brick as well.

So in my opinion, it's already possible to hide most of the "ugly" details, but it would cost more and take more time.

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I just looked at 18 homes in a neighboring state that are having problems with the AMV (adhered masonry veneer).

The builder found a problem with his own home that is thirteen months old, this pressed him to go further in his investigation as to what was going on and how wide spread the problems were. He got in touch with me and I made the trip to look over the homes in question, and some that were not in question. We found elevated moisture levels in all of the homes, the oldest of which is four years old.

I use a few documents to show problems with the installation of the AMV. One of them is the MVMA installation guidelines found here http://www.masonryveneer.org/

here is another article that sheds light on this subject http://www.wind-lock.com/DSN/wwwwindloc ... _12-09.pdf

I wrote an article for the JLC that came out Dec08 on a home I consulted on then helped supervise the repairs. We made the system drainable but I would add another layer of protection if I were doing it now. The drainage material I currently recommend is DeltaDry http://www.doerken.de/bvf-ca-en/product ... ts/dry.php

This will also combat solar driven vapors which can be a very big problem in a masonry assembly.

Scott

In answer to your objection to my classification of AMV being a "barrier cladding". I do agree with you, it should not be but most of the assemblies I review in fact are.

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