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This house was built in 2007. The back edge of the garage floor is broken in 4 spots. In the dead center of each broken spot is exposed rebar. I recommended it be repaired so that the rebar is not exposed to air / water that will cause it to rust, expand and cause more damage. My question is what product would you suggest in making the repairs?

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An angle grinder. Anything you put on for a patch will just keep popping off as the slab continues to settle, so cut it loose and let it go.

The alternative is to pull it out and replace it. Coring it, pumping concrete under it to support it, and patching the blow outs will have comparable costs and it will still be broken.

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If it is a concern to you I would simple tell my client that they should have it repaired or sealed so that the rebar is not exposed. I do not even attempt to tell my clients how things like that should re corrected.

That is about all I would say about it, in the grand scheme of things it is not that big of a deal.

FYI, most likely an acrylic self leveling type concrete patching compound would be the best bet to make a repair like that.

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Do they commonly pin a garage floor slab to the house foundation there? I guess I'd be wondering why it's settling first and then whether it's settling uniformly. I'd probably recommend they wait to see whether it's stopped settling before attempting to do anything. Once they know it's no longer moving, and as long as it's settled uniformly, still drains well and isn't too unsightly, paint a little binder on the divot, let it dry and then fill the divot with some concrete patcher and level it.

It's been five years. That's plenty of time for poorly compacted soil under a garage slab to consolidate. If that slab is still moving they need to find out why.

ONE TEAM - ONE FIGHT!!!

Mike

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Do they commonly pin a garage floor slab to the house foundation there? I guess I'd be wondering why it's settling first and then whether it's settling uniformly. I'd probably recommend they wait to see whether it's stopped settling before attempting to do anything. Once they know it's no longer moving, and as long as it's settled uniformly, still drains well and isn't too unsightly, paint a little binder on the divot, let it dry and then fill the divot with some concrete patcher and level it.

It's been five years. That's plenty of time for poorly compacted soil under a garage slab to consolidate. If that slab is still moving they need to find out why.

ONE TEAM - ONE FIGHT!!!

Mike

That sounds like the deal, if the slab floated free of the foundation you would have a uniform line of settlement, as seen, with no divets. And due to the divets is looks like the slab is going down, not the foundation moving up. Chalk lines are still visible on the foundation wall where the floor height was originally meant to be. Doesn't look like a structural issue.

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