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Crystal like deposits on the outside of H20 heater


macavoy
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Answer #1, Post water heater items on plumbing.

Looks to me like a crystalline residue left by prior leaks. This heater's housing looks to be on last legs. Does it leak as we speak? Maybe the water being heated is rife with mineral content. Why is this heater elevated anyway? Garage location?

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Wow!

Let's get the missing stuff off the plate.

Where did the cabinet legs go?

AND

Where is the sediment (drip) leg pipe?

What I see is a leaking water heater at the drain valve.

However Mike has a good point. How does the rest of the room look like?

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There was also some sort of water damage on the drywall above the heater...?????? Looked like a leak from above but there was no bathroom or roof above. This was in a garage with the 2nd story over the top of it...crazy.Could this drywall damage be related?

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When you say no bathroom or roof above...could you clarify that for me, please? Was there a ceiling directly above this? Did the flu look like it had rust forming on it? I have a couple things running through my head, but can't get a complete picture just yet. Was rust forming at the top of the tank, including at the hot/cold pipes at the top of the tank? I'll keep hold of my opinion on this, until all the facts are in.

Also...around here, the flex connector (some areas call it an appliance connector) should be called out. It should be changed to hard pipe. Connectors are great pieces of equipment, but they should be in an area where they won't get accidentally bumped into or have anything dropped onto them. And the valve for this connector is not a universal valve-it is specifically designed to be used with the connector it came with, and I can't tell from this picture if that was the case here. After 20+ years at the gas company, I can tell you contractors will tell call it out for replacement. Around here, they call it a Chicago valve (don't ask me...I have no idea why!).

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Well, around here, that tank would be called for lack of proper seismic restraint. We wouldn't call the flexible connector. In fact, around here flexible connectors are preferred at both the gas and the water lines to the tank, because of seismic events.

ONE TEAM - ONE FIGHT!!!

Mike

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I can certainly understand that, Mike. I would only say it needs to be out of harms way. We have them back here too. In fact, they need to be on Lennox Pulse furnaces...otherwise, the entire house will shake. Just installed where they won't be damaged. But I can see your point. Different areas, have different issues. Not having that much seismic activity in the Chicago area (but having a great deal of political wind in the heart of the city), it wouldn't have occurred to me. Good point of view! Thanks!

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