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I got a call today from a recent client asking me if I would send a fax to his insurance company verifying the age of the roof and furnace so he could get a break on his insurance. Of course I could verify the age of the furnace because of the SN, but since there is no visible SN on the shingles, I cannot verify the actual age of the shingles (or install date), so the shingles are a moot point in this discussion.

As for the furnace, my question. Do any of you get these requests and what do you do about them? As a matter of business, do you 1) send something on your letterhead verifying the information as requested, 2) ask the client to send the heating segment of the report as it speaks for itself or 3) punt and say that you do not get involved past the inspection and report? I sort of feel that this request is above and beyond, as my part of the arrangement includes the inspection and a published report in digital format. Taking time to send out requests to insurance companies is time consuming and not something I want to participate in. I will if this is common practice among "the Brethren," but I must say, I don't like it.

If it were from a Realtor (and I've had that), I do not honor their requests as part of policy and if it were from an attorney, (as I have written in an earlier post) I'd refer to my own council. In this case, you guys are my council as it seems innocent, but I just hate exposure I'm not used to dealing with.

I would appreciate your thoughts. Thanks in advance.

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Some insurers of old buildings seem to want to know the age of the major components. I get calls from clients, just after they apply for insurance, a couple times a month. Some have applied before the inspection and ask then.

I've never had to put anything in writing. I just spew numbers and they jot it down, so it can be added to the application.

Occasionally an insurer will have ridiculous questions or demands. I explain to my clients that those particular insurers are probably not the best choice for an old building and then give them the names of mine.

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For the roof, I'd go no further than the HI report since my contract/liability covers it.

For the furnace, if I were solidly convinced that I had the correct age, I'd do as Scott would.

I generally don't go outside the scope of the products that I offer but make exceptions for minor things for certain clients.

Marc

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I decided to take the path of the general consensus and write a letter on my letterhead qualifying the age of the furnace by the SN, and estimating the age of the roof. I made it clear that I cannot accurately determine the age of the roof covering or the installation date during a visual home inspection.

I build my business on excellent customer service, and a couple of you did convince me to write the letter to best serve my client. As I said earlier, I just hate the unnessary exposure.

Again, I appreciate the help and all of your comments. Have a good weekend.

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I include the age of the heating, A/C and water heater in my report.

If there is an inspection sticker on an updated main electrical panel, I include that too.

This way when I get those request, I tell them it's in the report.

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I include the age of the heating, A/C and water heater in my report.

If there is an inspection sticker on an updated main electrical panel, I include that too.

This way when I get those request, I tell them it's in the report.

This. Do you guys not include the age of furnace/ac/wh? I assumed everyone did.

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I absolutely include the model, serial number and age of the WH, AC and furnace/boiler on each of my reports. According to my client, his agent was looking for some letter (maybe for her file) on official letterhead verifying the ages of these items. Doing so gives my client a $100 break on his premium.

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I include the age of the heating, A/C and water heater in my report.

If there is an inspection sticker on an updated main electrical panel, I include that too.

This way when I get those request, I tell them it's in the report.

This. Do you guys not include the age of furnace/ac/wh? I assumed everyone did.

The age on that data plate is for the original system and it does not change when items like compressors, coils, etc are replaced. Yes, it is a good tool but do you actually know the age of the unit? It could have been completely rebuilt.

No, I seldom put down the age of an appliance or system. I just report them as newer condition; older condition and "This unit has had a good life". I also write a little blurb that basically says that the average life for this type system in our area is ___ years... And this unit has reached that time period, any additional life is just good fortune.

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I include the age of the heating, A/C and water heater in my report.

If there is an inspection sticker on an updated main electrical panel, I include that too.

This way when I get those request, I tell them it's in the report.

This. Do you guys not include the age of furnace/ac/wh? I assumed everyone did.

The age on that data plate is for the original system and it does not change when items like compressors, coils, etc are replaced. Yes, it is a good tool but do you actually know the age of the unit? It could have been completely rebuilt.

No, I seldom put down the age of an appliance or system. I just report them as newer condition; older condition and "This unit has had a good life". I also write a little blurb that basically says that the average life for this type system in our area is ___ years... And this unit has reached that time period, any additional life is just good fortune.

That's good info for your client, but for some reason, the insurance agent needs to have it all spelled out for him/her, no comprende.

Like the agent that insisted the mobile home needed to have the roof 'replaced'. 'Resurfaced' wasn't going to do it, it had to be 'replaced'. My client asked me to write a better letter. I suggested a better agent was required. [:)]

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