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These 12 yr old chimneys are for wood burning fireplaces now converted to gas logs.

The veneer is real stone, kind of thick and heavy. Should an engineer take a look? There is no indication of trouble, maybe just in my mind.

Would there normally be steel reinforcement between the flue liner and the veneer and if so, how would that be accomplished?

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I'd be concerned about what it is sitting on and how it is anchored in this case to the liner just like with with brick veneer. You might be able to see what its sitting on. It should be substantial. Is it? You probably can't see how it is attached to the liner.

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Correction - the fireplaces are metal heatalators and metal chimneys are just visible at the top. Everything is closed in behind facades. The foundation below is poured concrete with concrete ceilings in the crawlspace areas. Above the roof, all behind flashings, not visible. All the roof flashings are copper, BTW. Expense was not a factor in this place.

I'm saying stone veneer because the stone appears to be added from above the roofline up, supported by steel angle iron lintels. They are not conventional stone chimneys, obviously.

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John,

What is the angle Iron attached to?

How Are they attached?

The weight of the natural stone would cause extreme bending forces at the roof penetration during an earthquake.

You should recommend an engineer review the chimneys or at least review the stamped plans.

The new owner would not want the chimney to be like a three scope ice cream cone when you move the gear shift from 1st to 2nd, the cone is in your hand ......ice cream is on the seat.

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There's copper flashing all around the base. Not visible. They don't pass thru the attic, either.

The stone seems to be well attached with no sign of cracked mortar. In fact, all the rockwork is exceptional on this property. There are stone terraces everywhere. I'm starting to think the core of the chimneys may be reinforced concrete or maybe welded steel. We'll have to go back to the blueprints I agree.

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John,

What is the angle Iron attached to?

How Are they attached?

The weight of the natural stone would cause extreme bending forces at the roof penetration during an earthquake.

You should recommend an engineer review the chimneys or at least review the stamped plans.

The new owner would not want the chimney to be like a three scoop ice cream cone when you move the gear shift from 1st to 2nd, the cone is in your hand ......ice cream is on the seat.

Driving with an ice cream cone in your hand, tsk, tsk. You need to switch to an automatic. [:)]

We are no longer allowed to drive while operating a handheld device up here, but I don't think an ice cream cone could be called a device. It's still ok.

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