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i have a major leak under the crawl space of an addition on the house. before i start patching, i have serious doubts ANY of the home plumbing meets code. the source lines look like galvanized piping, within about 2 feet after the hot water heater, they switch to QEST-E-PB2110 3P tubing. its only 100psi, and 1/2" diameter (going up 2 floors). Also, a section of the galvanized intake pipe was patched at some point with 1/2" PVC. The numerous patches and materials in themselves make me think a total re-piping is in order, but I rent here, so, that's not going to happen. I can add more splices and patches to the mess, but if it doesn't meet code to start with, I'll pass the problem off to the landlord and a real plumber. oh! this is in Maryland, guess that would be important for code questions!

thanks

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Galvanized pipes were standard for many years, even through the 1980s in some parts of the country. The Qest piping is polybutylene, an approved material when it was sold, but subject to one of the largest class action lawsuits ever (plenty of info about it on the internet). PVC shouldn't be used for supply pipes inside the house.

If you're renting, why are you even considering dealing with it? Punt it to a plumber.

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Garet, what part of the country was still using galvanized water supply pipes through the 1980's?

I see it every so often in my area up into the early 80s. It's still listed as an acceptable material for water distribution piping in new construction if anyone wanted to bother with it.

Actually, of all of the water distribution piping materials, it has by far the longest proven service life.

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Garet, what part of the country was still using galvanized water supply pipes through the 1980's?

A relative's house on the north side of the LA basin had it, which was built in 1988. According to him, the local water is supposed to eat away at copper. Still, the galvanized lasted only 15 years or so before it choked off on the inside. Time will tell how long the copper lasts. Too bad the CA trade unions wouldn't allow CPVC for so long.

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We are responsible for repairs up to a $400, part of getting a really good rent cost, and also why I wanted all the info to argue that another patch just wasn't the right answer. Its all good, landlord stepped up right away and the plumber should be here early tomorrow morning.

thanks for the info folks.

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