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Katrina pictures


Darren
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Hi Denis,

We don't build cavity wall brick homes in this country anymore. The brick houses that we do have are brick "veneer". In other words, they are built with a wood frame and then a thin layer of brick is applied to the outside to give the appearance of a structural brick home.

I suppose the brick might help to keep a house floating off it's foundation like the one above, but it really doesn't add the kind of strength needed to resist the force of a hurricane.

ONE TEAM - ONE FIGHT!!!

Mike

2006122783150_VeneerBrickThruWallDetails.jpg

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We build houses with wall (60 or 85 cm). The External wall 2,5 brick or 3.5 brick, but internal partitons (between room) or 0,5 or 1 brick.

On your drawing wall 0,5 brick (we so use when coat old house from log).

Under such way of no strong connections between brick and wood frame.

Our industry produces much varieties of the brick. The Main mass of the building make from usual brick 0,25$/piece, but facade from very good 0,6$/piece.

Under such thickness sewer hurricane is not frightened. Can only vent the roof and split the window.

The Drawing I send a little later.

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Just a note: After having done the FEMA gig in N.O. and the surrounding areas post Katrina, I now believe there is no good way to tie a brick facade to a wood structure. Second only to roof damage was the masonry facades on lumber framed homes literally sucked (or blown) off of the house. Picture dozens of homes on a street where every one had the facde blown (sucked) off and currently residing horizontally in the front yard.

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Hi,

Thanks Chad, I'd suspected as much.

Denis,

I lived in masonry buildings like that during my tours in Germany when I was in the military. Very comfortable and solid, but they were a bit of a challenge to heat. About mid-way through my 1st German tour, they added E.I.F.S. to the exterior of the building and it was very comfortable after that.

Before everyone starts carping about how terrible E.I.F.S. systems are, try to remember that they've been used in Europe since after WWII and when they're used over masonry they work really well.

E.I.F.S. manufacturers can blame themselves for rushing the system into practice on this continent without conducting adequate research first on how the stuff would perform when installed over wood framing and then not training applicators well.

ONE TEAM - ONE FIGHT!!!

Mike

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