Jump to content

Recommended Posts

I have a room with two lights, one recessed and the other a chandelier. They are both on a three way circuit. So I have two wall switches and two lights. I am not sure where the electric comes in.

Can I replace the recessed light with a ceiling fan? My goal is to not have both fixtures on at the same time. I want to be able to run the fan without the chandelier and vice versa.

Link to post
Share on other sites

As far as I know, ceiling fan motors do not reliably have the torque to begin rotating if the switch is on low speed. A stationary fan with juice running through it heats up more than normal. That why pull chain and wall switches made for ceiling fans go from 'off' to 'high' first before proceeding to other speeds.

In the switching arrangement you propose, it's possible that someone might turn on the ceiling fan while it's in 'lo-speed' position and there's a likely chance that it won't start.

Marc

Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a room with two lights, one recessed and the other a chandelier. They are both on a three way circuit. So I have two wall switches and two lights. I am not sure where the electric comes in.

Can I replace the recessed light with a ceiling fan? My goal is to not have both fixtures on at the same time. I want to be able to run the fan without the chandelier and vice versa.

It might not be possible with the existing wiring. If so, you'd have to run new cables. Is there access to the space above the ceiling or is this between floors?

Link to post
Share on other sites

As far as I know, ceiling fan motors do not reliably have the torque to begin rotating if the switch is on low speed. A stationary fan with juice running through it heats up more than normal. That why pull chain and wall switches made for ceiling fans go from 'off' to 'high' first before proceeding to other speeds.

In the switching arrangement you propose, it's possible that someone might turn on the ceiling fan while it's in 'lo-speed' position and there's a likely chance that it won't start.

Marc

Really?

Not sure, if you have different fans in your area but they start just fine on low in other parts of the country...

Link to post
Share on other sites

Tim, if you Google 3-way switch wiring you will see diagrams of the many different ways your lights may be wired.

If you are able to wire the box for the fan to be on a separate switch, you will have to give up the 3-way switching.

A lot of the new fans have remote controls. So it might be possible to wire the fan so that it is always on, and then control it with the remote.

I say might because as you said we don't know where power comes in on your circuit.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I have my ceiling fan "on" in the low speed at the pull chain.

I control it from the light switch. It starts every time, though I've never paid attention to how fast it starts.

Same here, but mine has a remote. I press low, it comes on and spins.

Link to post
Share on other sites

As far as I know, ceiling fan motors do not reliably have the torque to begin rotating if the switch is on low speed. A stationary fan with juice running through it heats up more than normal. That why pull chain and wall switches made for ceiling fans go from 'off' to 'high' first before proceeding to other speeds.

In the switching arrangement you propose, it's possible that someone might turn on the ceiling fan while it's in 'lo-speed' position and there's a likely chance that it won't start.

Marc

Sorry, but this is not at all true.
Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...