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Fire rated door required?


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I am working on plans for my new garage/workshop/office building. It is a two story house that I am renovating. The front area, first floor, is going to be a two car garage on slab. The back area, first floor is going to be a workshop (woodshop). The second story is going to be two offices and a bathroom.

I would like there to be a big barn-style door (cheap and relatively easy to make, looks cool) between the woodshop and garage. However, I don't know how IRC 2003 applies to this specifically in regards to fire rating. A barn style door wouldn't exactly be fire rated. The woodshop and office aren't exactly "habitable space", either. All information is appreciated! Thanks!

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It does sound like you will be converting a residental building into a commercial building. First you need to see what the zoning restrictions are and if it is even allowed. An independent structure with office space would not be allowed in my area, but I can have an office in my home. You might be looking at using the IBC instead of the IRC if this is labeled a commercial building.

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Thanks for the replies. I have received a zoning variance for the structure. That means that it has NOT been "rezoned" as commercial, but an exception for my use has been granted (at great expense and almost 8 month battle. If I'd known going into it what I was getting into I would have thought of something else to do with my time, but that's a whole different story...)

I am going to go to the local code department, for sure. My understanding, after talking to them last time about window requirements, is that this is not a commercial building and it is subject to IRC 2003. However, I am mildly afraid that I'm going to get a different opinion from each different person who looks at this thing.

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Thanks for the replies. I have received a zoning variance for the structure. That means that it has NOT been "rezoned" as commercial, but an exception for my use has been granted (at great expense and almost 8 month battle. If I'd known going into it what I was getting into I would have thought of something else to do with my time, but that's a whole different story...)

I am going to go to the local code department, for sure. My understanding, after talking to them last time about window requirements, is that this is not a commercial building and it is subject to IRC 2003. However, I am mildly afraid that I'm going to get a different opinion from each different person who looks at this thing.

2003? Seriously? Indiana needs to get with the program. That was three code cycles ago.

Aside from that, the IRC clearly states, in its first pages, that it's only intended for use with dwellings.

That said, you really want to get a solid opinion from the code department, in writing, before you spend time & money drawing up plans - or even designing anything.

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..........................However, I am mildly afraid that I'm going to get a different opinion from each different person who looks at this thing.

That doesn't necessarily stop after approvals depending on a lot of stuff. I've never met a planning, zoning, or building dept. that didn't reserve the right to change their mind.

Going through zoning and use changes resulting in structural & egress alterations can get really goofy. Did I say "can get"? I should have said does get.

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We here in the Hoosier State have never particularly been out ahead of the wave in anything. We're kind of a cautions follower of a state.

Anyway, warnings heeded. Most people at the building department here just want you to GTFO of the office so they can continue doing whatever else they do rather than help customers--obviously not update the codes. So I am always hesitant to go in there until I have a very clear idea of what I'm asking them, which usually means doing a bunch of design work first. I find that nothing having specific questions for them just makes them angry and then me feel like my tax dollars are yelling at me.

Thanks!

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Do keep in mind that the AHJ has no obligation to tell you what's needed. That's your contractor's job. It's simply not in the AHJ's job description. If he helps you, he's going out of his way. At least that's how it is around here.

Marc

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Do keep in mind that the AHJ has no obligation to tell you what's needed. That's your contractor's job. It's simply not in the AHJ's job description. If he helps you, he's going out of his way. At least that's how it is around here.

Marc

Around here it is not the contractor's job to interpret the code (although the contractor is required to follow the code). The architect determines the design and code requirements. The local construction department checks the drawings and performs the inspections.

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Same here. The paper trail goes back to the architect or engineer.

AHJ's are intended to provide quality assurance by checking the plans and quality control that the work conforms to the plans.

I see them blow it on both counts all the time.

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It works the same way here. However, my impression is that the original poster is designing and building this project himself - no design professional and no contractor.

Now, in my area, the building departments encourage do-it-yourselfers to come in and review their plans informally before submitting an official set of plans. They are usually happy to help point homeowners in the right direction, particularly if the homeowners bring an offering of a box of donuts. . .

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It works the same way here. However, my impression is that the original poster is designing and building this project himself - no design professional and no contractor.

Now, in my area, the building departments encourage do-it-yourselfers to come in and review their plans informally before submitting an official set of plans. They are usually happy to help point homeowners in the right direction, particularly if the homeowners bring an offering of a box of donuts. . .

In my area there are too many lawyers looking for clients. The building departments do not want the added liability and they are hesitant to tell the owners how to design their projects.

I am meeting with someone tomorrow morning that wants to remove some walls in their home. The contractor and construction department told them they need plans from a licensed architect.

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Behind on our codes, slightly. The state is however, updating the IBC later this month; however, I do not believe they are addressing the IRC.

To top it off, the City of Indianapolis does not issue Certificates of Occupancy either. You are given a card to fill out, have the various trades, or the architect , sign said card saying all work was properly completed and then you return the card to the building department.

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