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Gas lines in Icynene sealed attic, how to vent?


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I just completed the exterior (and framing) of an ICF house in Florida, and it has a barrel tile roof. Plan was to use open cell Icynene insulation in cathedral type attic. However, the gas pipe installer installed galvanized gas pipes in the attic for the gas appliances. Now I'm worried about the lack of venting should there be a gas leak. The house was built for a sealed attic. How can I solve the problem of venting for a potential gas leak and still use Icynene? Should I change the plan to use a radiant barrier on styrofoam board, seal the perimeters, and use cellulose on the ceiling floor, or what? Perhaps a forced air system through the attic?

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Icynene that's thick enough to meet code for a sealed attic is not going to be anywhere near as air-permeable as fluffy insulation. Do you have ductwork or other mechanicals in the attic? What's the reason for the sealed attic? And, there is plenty of gas pipe installed within the envelopes of houses, so I'm not sure it's a concern anyway. Is there a requirement that gas pipe only be installed in ventilated spaces?

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My HVAC man says black, not galvanized, is the pipe for gas, as galvanized can flake off and cause problems.

Suzanne, are you a designer? "Cathedral" type attic? Scissor trusses? If gas pipes supply appliances, why are they in the attic?

Like the other replies, I do not get what the concern is.

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To answer the questions: Code does not allow gas pipes to be installed under the house slab. The pipe used was galvanized and the AC and heating units are not in the attic but the ductwork is, and no combustible or mechanical devices are in the attic. However, there are lots of recessed cans for lights that could possibly create a spark that could possibly ignite the gas if there were to be a leak in one of the pipe fittings. The reason for the sealed attic (with Icynene) was to keep the humidity and heat out of the attic, since this is a super hot and humid place near the beach, ie the attic would become part of the conditioned space so I'd have a cooler, more energy efficient house. I am not a designer, and none of the officials of any type, all over the country, have been able to provide an answer. I appreciate all the communication, I'm trying to make informed decisions and this is helping me determine the best insulation plan.

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. . . and none of the officials of any type, all over the country, have been able to provide an answer. I appreciate all the communication, I'm trying to make informed decisions and this is helping me determine the best insulation plan.

It seems abundantly clear to me that you can just put the foam over the gas pipes. They need no ventilation. The foam won't hurt the pipes and the pipes won't hurt the foam.

Gas pipes are run through small spaces in houses all the time. There's no need to isolate gas pipes from recessed lights or any other source of sparks or ignition. Heck, we run gas pipes into furnaces where the flames are two or three inches from the gas pipes and their joints.

You are grossly overthinking this and trying to solve a problem that's not a problem.

Install your insulation and move on to obsess about something else.

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