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I saw something for the first time today. Laminated tounge in groove pine planks that spanned between beams without joists of any kind. The laminated planks were three pieces of pine plank that totaled about 2 or more inches thick. There were three structural beams between the foundation walls instead of the usual one in the middle. That divided the distance from wall to wall into 4 spans. The floors were very solid. Anyone have information on this construction type?

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Looks like it. What makes you think that the 2x6s are laminated?

Traditional construction around here is girders every 3 or 4 feet with 2x6 tongue & groove "car decking" between them. No joists.

That usually forms the subfloor though. Very few people use it as a finished floor - although it's like that in my house.

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Looks like it. What makes you think that the 2x6s are laminated?

Traditional construction around here is girders every 3 or 4 feet with 2x6 tongue & groove "car decking" between them. No joists.

That usually forms the subfloor though. Very few people use it as a finished floor - although it's like that in my house.

When I pulled a register damper from the main floor I could see a cross section of the laminated planks. I should have took a picture because it was clearly three pieces of 1x6 pine laminated together with tounge in groove cut in to lock it all together.

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Looks like it. What makes you think that the 2x6s are laminated?

Traditional construction around here is girders every 3 or 4 feet with 2x6 tongue & groove "car decking" between them. No joists.

That usually forms the subfloor though. Very few people use it as a finished floor - although it's like that in my house.

When I pulled a register damper from the main floor I could see a cross section of the laminated planks. I should have took a picture because it was clearly three pieces of 1x6 pine laminated together with tounge in groove cut in to lock it all together.

Google " Deck House ". That is what their flooring systems look like.

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When I pulled a register damper from the main floor I could see a cross section of the laminated planks. I should have took a picture because it was clearly three pieces of 1x6 pine laminated together with tounge in groove cut in to lock it all together.

Sounds like a creative carpenter. If you stack and glue them you could just offset the center one to make both tongue and groove, no?

I once had some pieces of flooring from an old academic building that was gutted and rebuilt inside. It used solid four by twelve pine joists spaced pretty far with 3X8 pine floorboards grooved both sides and splined.

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When I pulled a register damper from the main floor I could see a cross section of the laminated planks. I should have took a picture because it was clearly three pieces of 1x6 pine laminated together with tounge in groove cut in to lock it all together.

Sounds like a creative carpenter. If you stack and glue them you could just offset the center one to make both tongue and groove, no?

Yes, but be careful not to glue the tongue & groove joints or you'll have an expansion/contraction nightmare.

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When I pulled a register damper from the main floor I could see a cross section of the laminated planks. I should have took a picture because it was clearly three pieces of 1x6 pine laminated together with tounge in groove cut in to lock it all together.

Sounds like a creative carpenter. If you stack and glue them you could just offset the center one to make both tongue and groove, no?

I once had some pieces of flooring from an old academic building that was gutted and rebuilt inside. It used solid four by twelve pine joists spaced pretty far with 3X8 pine floorboards grooved both sides and splined.

That's what it was basically. I'm pissed at myself for not taking pictures to share. I might be going back for follow up radon testing. If so, I take some pictures.

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Probably the light or something, but from here it almost looks like the top is oak or ash. The bottom is definitely pine. Am I seeing it right?

It may be a combination of species. I'll check that out further if I go back. If the top is hardwood and the bottom is pine, I'm sure I'll be able to probe and tell the difference in hardness.

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How old is the building?

1977

As I suggested earlier the flooring system you photographed was common in a prefab called a "Deck House". Check out some 1977 styles to see if they are similar to what you inspected.

http://www.ncmodernist.org/deck.htm

http://moderncapitaldc.com/2008/10/29/u ... -for-830k/

Interesting pictures. Thanks for posting the link. Many of the exposed beam interior features were similar but I did not see anything strikingly similar with regard to exterior shape or design. The one that I inspected had been modified and added to, at least once for sure and probably more. A large bump out for a kitchen and second floor bedroom was added. And I believe the lofty vaulted ceiling was modified to be utilized as another sleeping area.

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