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Denray

Vinyl window in stucco

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In this case, for self-flashing windows, a gap of about 3/8th is left along all four sides of the window, between the wood and the stucco.  A solid rubber tubing is inserted into the gap, then the gap is sealed with elastomeric caulk.  The rubber backing imparts an hourglass profile to the cross-section of the caulk so that the narrow part of the caulk will contract and expand rather than cause failure of the bonds between caulk and wood or caulk and stucco.

Where the cornice is so far above the window that the siding above the window sees rain, the top of the window is flashed instead of caulked.

Marc

Mike: It would nice if the posts of a thread were numbered like before, not that it's absolutely needed.

Edited by Marc
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27 minutes ago, Marc said:

In this case, for self-flashing windows, a gap of about 3/8th is left along all four sides of the window, between the wood and the stucco.  A solid rubber tubing is inserted into the gap, then the gap is sealed with elastomeric caulk

I've never heard the phrase "self-flashing". Seems misleading if no flashings are involved and it's only caulking.

When you say "solid rubber tubing" are you talking about foam backer rod?

My first post here and my name is John Fryer. I'm a home inspector in Berkeley California.

 

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7 hours ago, John Fryer said:
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I've never heard the phrase "self-flashing". Seems misleading if no flashings are involved and it's only caulking.

After checking this out further, I have to agree with you: It's a industry-created selling point with no real value.  Another myth hits the dust.

All window ROs need flashing.

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When you say "solid rubber tubing" are you talking about foam backer rod?

Yes.

Marc

 

 

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7 hours ago, Denray said:

In a perfect world shouldn't this not be exposed? Does this look proper?3.JPG.894a191d897596d62988414b2910913b.JPG 

Looks like part of the window frame to me but I haven't seen a window quite like this one.

I do see a narrow, unsealed gap in there.  Nope, doesn't look kosher.

Marc

Edited by Marc

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..........I believe it's a very typical vinyl, prime window with a built-in J-mold/nailing flange. The stucco substrate has been extended into the J receiver and the stucco applied. It appears to be located in an area protected by a deep roof overhang - simple caulking may be all that's needed..............Greg

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Mark has the right reply: backer rod and caulk is necessary for stucco and EIFS installations to manage expansion and contraction between two different materials.Openings can allow moisture to enter and get trapped in the wall. Typically these are face systems with no drainage plane. The overhang may or may not protect it, but it's not done properly.

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As others have stated, windows are not self-flashing. A gap (typically 1/4"), backer rod and caulk are needed, along with head flashing. 

Windows with integral flanges intended for use with vinyl siding are not suitable for stucco. They are WRONG. I believe some manufacturers supply filler strips for these, but I have not seen any documentation about that recently.

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