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Smart House Wire System


Tom English
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Anyone familiar with Smart House wiring systems?

My research thus far leads me to believe this is an obsolete system. I did not find the controller (finished basement drywall covered everything i.e. waste outlet,water inlet etc.).

Today, on a callback concerning a failed light swith, the client removed the switch plate (quad switch) and to my dismay I was staring at what appeared to be flat computer cables with those computer lookin' din connectors.

I do not know how to explain this cofiguration to my client.

Over a thousand inspections and have never encounterd this system.

SOOOO, wadda ya think? Did I blow this one?

Tom

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All Smart Homes that I have seen are a nightmare. As for being old or obsolete, they are far from that. Just do a Google search and you will find tons of stuff on them.

One thing that I really don't like is that many do not have wall switch's for the lights. They have sensors that turn the lights on and off, so when the system goes "Dumb", Houston you have a major problem.

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Randy,

I apply ASHI sop. I am aware of the low voltage exclusion. Please understand that I am not looking for a "get out of jail free" coupon.

I am feeling that I let my client down but not having the knowledge to

fully inform him of the potential for costly repairs for this system.

I found this site http://www.smarthouseonline.com/ and it scared the S**t

out of me!

I am thinking about returning to this house (townhouse actually) and doing further investigative work. I am just not sure if doing so will make my client even "more" uneasy about my inspection

Tom

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I've had a few of those houses.

When I realized that I had those, I simply informed the client that I don't inspect, nor do I render any sort of opinion about, low-voltage or automated/computerized electronic lighting controls. I limit what I do in those cases to simply checking the on/off on the light switches and testing the receptacles for polarity and grounding and make it crystal clear to the client that I am not the person to call if any of those electronic gizmo's fails.

I had one of those houses where I didn't realize such a system was in place and there was an issue. A switch failed and the client called me to tell me that a switch had failed and when an electronic came out he'd learned that it had electronic controls of some sort. He asked whether the issue was covered under the scope of the inspection. I told him that I was sorry for his trouble, but that it did not. I directed him to the pre-inspection agreement and where it specifically excluded those types of devices, and pointed out that, since I never open those Cat V, cable, alarm, satellite TV and other fancy electronic enclosure boxes in closets, basements and garages, there's no way, short of an invasive inspection, that I would have even known that he had such a system. It was unfortunate that it broke, but there it is.

I advised him to do a google search for automated switch gear system repairs and hung up. I've never talked to him since, but I did get a referral from him since then, so I have to assume that when he said that he was satisfied with my explanation and hung up that he was.

Since you aren't expected to disassemble receptacles, wall switches or fixtures, you had no way to know that that was what you were dealing with. Right? If so, just tell the client that and have him/her contact a smart house specialist to deal with fixing the gizmos.

ONE TEAM - ONE FIGHT!!!

Mike

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Originally posted by Tom English

Randy,

I apply ASHI sop. I am aware of the low voltage exclusion. Please understand that I am not looking for a "get out of jail free" coupon.

I am feeling that I let my client down but not having the knowledge to

fully inform him of the potential for costly repairs for this system.

I found this site http://www.smarthouseonline.com/ and it scared the S**t

out of me!

I am thinking about returning to this house (townhouse actually) and doing further investigative work. I am just not sure if doing so will make my client even "more" uneasy about my inspection

Tom

Tom, I hear you. I wish I could know everything there is to know about everything and then report to the client that I know everything about everything but the fact is I don't know everything about everything and I can't feel guilty that I don't know everything about everything.

What if a client discovers a $25,000 sewer line problem 6 months after closing. Should you also have caught that?

Here's to learning more of everthing about everything.

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