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Reference Sources


Shooter Mike
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Well crap, that is a long list. At least for me anyways. The ironic thing is that none of the home inspection books currently published would make it on my list of essentials. I have a bunch and have read them all but I have never used them as a cited reference.

At least for me in my Oregon practice the reference that I use the most is the Oregon Residential Specialty Code. Followed by -

Electrical Inspections of Existing Dwellings and the NEC

Then the list gets long of refrences I use occasionally maybe once or twice a week.

I would say that JLC and TIJ are essential

There is just a horred list of articles, books and web sites availible that anyone might find usefull.

I imagine that some inspectors lists might have to come as abridged book. [;)]

Chris, Oregon

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Originally posted by Bain

Here's a link I used this past Friday afternoon to 'splain what was lurking in an attic. The EPA's photo is pretty similar to the photo I snapped, huh?

John

Download Attachment: icon_photo.gif DSC06820a.jpg

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http://www.epa.gov/asbestos/pubs/insulation.html

Did you have it tested? Not all vermiculite contains asbestos.

More than once, I've grabbed a teaspoon of vermiculite, closed it in an envelope and directed the client to take it to a local lab and spend $30. to get it tested for asbestos. So far, only about 50% of those tests have come back positive for asbestos.

OT - OF!!!

M.

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A guy took a sample yesterday that was zapped off to be tested by a lab. Also, FYI, the buyer called a few mitigation companies, and the cost of removal is four or five K.

The air handler is in the attic, and we all know that closed systems don't really exist . . .

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Originally posted by Bain

A guy took a sample yesterday that was zapped off to be tested by a lab. Also, FYI, the buyer called a few mitigation companies, and the cost of removal is four or five K.

Sounds about normal.

The air handler is in the attic, and we all know that closed systems don't really exist . . .

Neither does the adult or kid exist who has never breathed asbestos if they've ever ridden in a car with the windows open. [:-magnify

OT - OF!!!

M.

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Hey, Mike.

The results came back on the vermiculite today and they were negative, which surprised me. I've come across that stuff maybe ten times before and the tests were always positive.

Now I feel like sort of a goof for telling my customer the insulation almost assuredly contained asbestos, but have learned my lesson. Don't ya just hate learnin' those lessons . . . ?

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