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Aluminum Gas Supply Line?


dtontarski
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This water heater has what appears to be an aluminum gas supply line. Is this an approved gas supply line material?

Yes - I did note that there is no TPRV extension pipe and that the unit is not vented properly. (the draft hood was never installed, the horizontal draft run has a negative pitch, and several other exigent conditions)

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Hi,

That's referred to as a flexible connector and it cannot be any longer than 3ft.; except in the case of a clothes dryer or a range, in which case it may be longer than 6ft. (IRC 2421.1.2/UPC 1212.OX1) That hard pipe line should stop no farther than 3ft. from the water heater so that a connector less than 3ft. long can be used.

There's just so much wrong with this installation. It's pretty obvious that a professional didn't install it. Hope you told the client that and made sure the client understood how dangerous these can be when they're improperly installed.

OT - OF!!!

M.

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Thanks Mike. As always, a detailed reply. Yes - this entire set-up was called out as exigent and the repair people will be there this morning when I am setting up my radon equipment. (off course every window in the home was open when I arrive to set it up the first time...but hey...these open windows may have saved these folks from CO) The horizontal vent has a negative horizontal pitch, no draft hood at the water heater itself (one located in the vent about 8' away), marginal clearance to ceiling joists, etc......

So no problem with the aluminum tubing itself?

NOTE: The forced air gas furnace which shared a common unlined flue, had similar issues. I think the water heater was actually causing spillage at the draft diverter for this. When I fired up the furnace, the spillage in this area made me drop the cover and jump back.

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Mike is right with his comments. Aluminum can be used for gas transmission, but like copper there are a bizillion kinds of alum. Mich Consolidated Gas Co used alum with plastic cover for decades on the interior of thousands of homes. In some areas they used a compression fitting and other places a flare fitting - neither is now an approved method.

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Originally posted by Les

Mike is right with his comments. Aluminum can be used for gas transmission, but like copper there are a bizillion kinds of alum. Mich Consolidated Gas Co used alum with plastic cover for decades on the interior of thousands of homes. In some areas they used a compression fitting and other places a flare fitting - neither is now an approved method.

I've never heard of such a thing.

The item in Dave's picture look like a stainless steel flex connector to me.

- Jim Katen, Oregon

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In the 60's it was typically covered with a 15mil yellow plastic that was heat bonded on and had to be cut away to make connections. Then in the late 60's and early 70's they used a clear plastic. The alum was quite tough and easy to kink. I have never seen it larger than 3/8" id

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