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Cracked concrete tile roof


hausdok
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Here's one for those of you who see a lot of concrete tile roofs.

I did a $1.4M home the other day that had a concrete tile roof. I can't be certain, but they looked like Monier tiles. The issue was that at all fields of the roof, there were literally hundreds, perhaps thousands, of tiles with the lower right-hand corners either cracked or broken off. The cracks begin about 1-1/4 inche in from the lower right-hand corner and go diagonally up toward the right edge, forming a slightly arching/irregular hypotenuse of a right triangle about 2-1/2 inches long.

Now here's the kicker. These cracks were so consistent that with most you could unplug the cracked corner of one shingle, where the corner hadn't fallen off yet, and plug it into the lower right corner of one where the corner had already fallen away and the fit was almost perfect. So good in fact, that from several feet away the crack was barely visible.

The location of the cracks is in the overlap, so they don't allow the roof to leak. However, I'm certain that when you pay this kind of money for a roof you don't want every 3rd or 4th tile damaged. Hell, I would be unhappy with it at 1/10th the cost. This would appear to be manufacturing related - perhaps something related to the mould that these shingles were poured into or a careless worker that is removing them from a production line and consistently setting them the same way every time on the same corner when they are green.

Have any of you California, Arizona, Florida guys or gals seen or heard anything like this?

ONE TEAM - ONE FIGHT!!!

Mike

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Mike this is from this web site http://www.ntrma.org/tech9902.htm

Why do corners sometimes break after installation?

The corners of the tile at the interlock are the thinnest portion of the tile and as such are the most susceptible to damage. When properly installed, there is usually no problem with corner breakage. If the tiles are not properly aligned however, there is the potential for point loading that puts irregular pressure onto the corner, causing it to fracture. This most often happens when the tiles are applied to tightly together. Most tiles are designed to be installed with a 1/16 inch shunt or separation between the tile bodies. If this shunt is not maintained, damage from foot traffic or the expansion and contraction of the roof deck could result. Debris left in the channel during application could also result in point loading that may break the corners under foot traffic.

Captain

PS get a camera

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Mike,

Sounds like an unsealed 75# underlayment. Did the underlayment have a granular surface? If it's the system I think it is then the tiles are there only to protect the underlayment from the UV and for aesthetic reasons. The roof should be watertight without the tiles.

NORM

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Mike,

I've seen it, like, 4 million times. The tiles are damaged when they are packed, shipped, or loaded onto the roof. The installers put them up cracked, and sometimes the chip stays in place, sometimes it doesn't. In AZ the construction standards say any chip over the size of a quarter must be replaced, as well as ANY cracked tiles. Monier has a great website, with lots of info.

Along those lines, heres what happened to me last week:

I have recently had to change my policy of doing “pre-closingâ€

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Mike,

As far as the Arizona standards Chris hit the nail on the head. Bigger than a quarter needs to be replaced.

As far as walking on the roof a Monier rep showed us at an AZ-ASHI meeting how to do it properly. I weigh 230 and I walk two a day.

Chris,

Why is this the first I heard of your Pulte problem. Let me know how I can help.

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Originally posted by chrisprickett

They’ve since backed off, and are going to fix the tiles and honor his warranty, but they told him that their purpose was to send a message to me.

They actually told your client that? I'm sure the pit bull will love sinking his teeth into that meaty mistake. Duh!

Brian G.

Sic em' boy! [:-dog]

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Mike,The 75# unsealed system was used commonly here in S. Florida in the late 80's and early 90's. Due to it's premature failure rate it is no longer allowed.

Chris,

The builder restrictions you describe are typical here in S. Florida. We still do pre-closing inspections and for an additional fee return after the closing to do that which the builder prohibited at the initial inspection. The clients understand and so far no objection.

NORM

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Originally posted by hausdok

Chris & Scott,

Just curious, are they using the 75# hot-mopped felt method that Florida uses in Arizona too, or is it done similar to here.

OT - OF!!!

M.

system 1 unsealed roof are still being applied in other parts of FL (aside from SE FL) Some are system 2, which is sort a hybrid; sealed underlayment, but tiles adehered with fasteners.

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Scott,

I have our resident pitbull (JE) in the case. I might just be a test subject.

Brian,

The buyer got it in writing that the builder is backing off, so I got paid. I suspect this is not the last of it.

Norm,

I'm just too busy to do a preclosing and a follow up. Post closing was working fine, until this.

Mike,

Out here just felt, no hot mop.

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  • 6 years later...

Hi guys, i know this is on old post however the tiles you are talking about are made by an Australian company. Monier have the main concrete tile manufactoring plant here.

The cracks you speak of are called 'broken noses'. This occurs during transport and during installation. Sometimes the tiles can be a little odd shapped due to maintainance being required for machines and cause problems where the 'noses' break a lot easier with downwards pressure put on these weaker spots. This chips will not cause any leaks.

Other areas of concern for these tiles are broken 'water courses'. These are chips tiles right down the bottom on the other side of the tile in the water drainage channel. this will cause leaks and is very common with weak tiles.

cheers,

Phil

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Thanks Phil,

I'm glad to finally hear from someone who is very familiar with this phenomenon. It's kind of neat too that years after they are posted, questions are still getting answered here on TIJ.

Makes me feel llike a proud papa.

ONE TEAM - ONE FIGHT!!!

Mike

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  • 9 years later...

When assessing tile damage, we need to look at big picture. Wind event, what were wind speeds in area? how close to eye? what direction did win move? when seeing patterned lower corner breaks, more indicative of chatter. Upper corner cracks will occur on fastened roofs and lower cracks. You have to look at big picture. 

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If it shows in a patter, more indicative of chatter stress break. Most tiles have locking channels, so if installed incorrectly they wouldn’t sit right and alignment would be screwed up. expansion and contraction is based on 20 degree temp differential, so in Florida the rate is .00065 of an inch which is negligible. It could be a defect but they are random not patterned. you look in those areas for uplift, upper corner cracks and irregular breaks. If It was as patterned as you say, I’m sure those things were present.

I know many try to ignore uplift but it is a reality. The older the roof, the more vulnerable. 

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