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Weep Holes


Terence McCann
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Hi Terry,

I'm not sure what you mean by "cultured" brick. Do you mean that the bricks are all concrete bricks of different colors made to look like clay brick? Was it a full-concrete veneer that has had a brick coursing pattern cut into. Or, was it a faux brick facing adhered to a bed or Portland cement over extruded wire lath and then struck to look like full-depth brick?

If it is a full brick veneer it needs weeps and through-wall flashings. If a concrete face over lath or faux bricks set into a bed over lath, it should be done like veneer and be clear of the soil and any flatwork so it can drain from behind.

ONE TEAM - ONE FIGHT!!!

Mike

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I'm with Mike; what is "cultured brick"? I'm assuming that you mean those soft brick that are adhered to a fibrous/celotex substrate. They don't need weepholes.

If it is a "real" brick veneer sitting on a brick shelf on the foundation, you needs weepholes, wicks, & through wall flashing.

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Originally posted by Jim Katen

You can get a box of 20 weepholes for about $10 at Home Depot.

What a rip-off. I'll sell 'em to you for half of that, shipping included. [:-mischievous]

Brian G.

Direct Importer of Fine European Weep Holes (Made in China) [:)]

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This irritates the living crap out of me. They're required for all the commercial work that's done around here, complete with mortar net and flashing. But residential?? LAHJ has deemed the unnecessary. [:-banghead] [:-banghead] [:-banghead]

Stupid idiots. With all the "mold is gold" people running around, you'd think they'd enforce a construction standard that allows water to leave a wall cavity.[:o]

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Originally posted by Konrad

This irritates the living crap out of me. They're required for all the commercial work that's done around here, complete with mortar net and flashing. But residential?? LAHJ has deemed the unnecessary. [:-banghead] [:-banghead] [:-banghead]

Stupid idiots. With all the "mold is gold" people running around, you'd think they'd enforce a construction standard that allows water to leave a wall cavity.[:o]

Someone needs to get to the chief building official and educate him. Ignorance is easy to eradicate.

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Jim -

My gosh only having seen them in Chicago, Dallas, St. Louis and in picture books, I had no idea what they cost.

At that price no wonder our poor builders don't put them in - if they put them in thats $20-$40 of profit thats not in their pocket.

No wonder our house are so affordable - we don't use that expensive stuff like weep holes and the extra length of hose running exhaust fans to the outside rather than the attic.

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Originally posted by DLRambo

In Kansas City you don't see weep holes in the brick - maybe its too expensive.

Dan Bowers

I inspect new construction in Southern KCMO area and ALL brick veneer must have weep holes. I won't pass a home for occupancy without them. Without weep holes, you have not only the potential for moisture problems and rot, but eventually it "WILL" happen. There has to be a way for that moisture to leave from behind the brick veneer.

Weep holes and wicks are dirt cheap. Cheaper than the home depot price quoted above. Cost is not an issue anyway, especially when faced with the potentials of NOT having them. If weep holes are not installed on a home, it is usually due to poor quality build work, not due to being cost prohibitive.

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Slight thread drift, but...

During the final stages of construction on the commercial side the finish grade guy will come in with black dirt and a box scraper and sometimes finish the grade above the brick course with the weep holes in it.

A hole in the brick just inches below the surface is asking for water to go into the wall cavity. Keep them weeps above the finish grade. [b)]

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  • 7 months later...

Some comments:

First, regardless of what type of brick or masonry that you have, if you have an airspace, or cavity behind the veneer, then you need weepholes at the masonry sill, opening head/sills, etc.

Second, assuming that there is a good through-wall flashing installed, a little water temporarily in the weep holes is no problem as long as the water level does not rise above the top of the flashing (and assuming that the flashing is not compromised).

Of course, weep holes beneath grade level are not a good idea in any case.

A

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