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stryped
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These are t8 flourescent (shop lights) 4 feet wide. Hang from a small chain. They have a plug and cord attached.

I was going to wire outlets in the ceiling above each light to "plug in" the light. Of course the outlets would be wired to a swtich so they can be turned off and on.

Someone told me all outlets, even those in the ceiling need GFCI protection. SO I planned on running a 20 amp GFCI breaker to all 11 outlets. (One of the outlets is for a garage door opener, the rest are for lights.

Is it some type of violation or safety problem if all the available lighting is on a GFCI circuit? (Where if the circuit trips, there is no available light?)

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These are t8 flourescent (shop lights) 4 feet wide. Hang from a small chain. They have a plug and cord attached.

These fixtures are designed to be plugged in, wiring outlets in the ceiling is the correct method.

Someone told me all outlets, even those in the ceiling need GFCI protection. SO I planned on running a 20 amp GFCI breaker to all 11 outlets. (One of the outlets is for a garage door opener, the rest are for lights.

Yes all garage receptacles are required to be GFCI. I would gang the shop lights in pairs with one duplex receptacle for each pair, and run a seperate circuit for the garage door opener. I might also consider multiple switches for the lights so that they don't all have to be on at once. This would save you a bunch of material, probably enough to pay for the extra breakers. BTW, 15 amps is plenty for these loads and 14 gauge wire is cheaper and easier to work than the 12ga you need for a 20 amp circuit.

Is it some type of violation or safety problem if all the available lighting is on a GFCI circuit? (Where if the circuit trips, there is no available light?)

No, but it is damned inconvenient. Dedicating a circuit for the opener will provide some light if by chance the lighting circuit trips at the GFCI or the breaker.

Tom

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I guess I am confused about garages also. I was under the impression that single dedicated outlets for refrigerators and freezers and ceiling outlets for garage door openers were both exempt from GFI protection.

I found this site stating. It is dated May, 2007. Is this no longer acceptable?

http://ecmweb.com/mag/electric_branch_circuits_part_2/

If I am incorrect please steer me in the correct direction as to where I can find current info.

So according to what I am reading above, it is no longer acceptable to have any outlets in a garage that are not GFI protected?

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I guess I am confused about garages also. I was under the impression that single dedicated outlets for refrigerators and freezers and ceiling outlets for garage door openers were both exempt from GFI protection.

I found this site stating. It is dated May, 2007. Is this no longer acceptable?

http://ecmweb.com/mag/electric_branch_circuits_part_2/

If I am incorrect please steer me in the correct direction as to where I can find current info.

So according to what I am reading above, it is no longer acceptable to have any outlets in a garage that are not GFI protected?

The 2008 NEC removed the exemptions that you mention. All receptacle outlets in a garage are supposed to have GFCI protection per the 2008 NEC.

- Jim Katen, Oregon

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210.8(A)(2) & (A)(5): Expanded GFCI protection requirements by deleting exceptions for receptacles that are not readily accessible and receptacles located in dedicated spaces to supply an appliance.

• 210.8(B)(4): Expanded GFCI protection requirements to include all outdoor 15- and 20-ampere, 125-volt receptacles, and added a conditional exception to permit use of assured equipment grounding conductor program in industrial establishments.

• 210.8(B)(5): Added GFCI protection requirements for all 15- and 20-ampere 125-volt receptacles installed within 6 ft of the outside edge of sinks, and added exceptions for receptacles in industrial laboratories where the loss of power would introduce a greater hazard and for receptacles in patient care areas where critical care equipment may be utilized.

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Thank you very much. I must admit I still don't understand the logic?

So on inspection of homes built prior to 2007 with all of the dedicated refrigerator/freezer outlets that are not GFCI protected, are you all recommending that they be GFCI protected or do you just inform them that they are not and should be? In other words how strong is your language in your reports?

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My bad, just reviewed 2008 NEC and these exemptions have been removed

But in Oregon, there are local (state) exemptions to the removed exemptions! (Check your local amendments/rules.)

Like a sump pump in a garage and specific appliances.

The exemptions are at this link on adobe reader page 17 (document page 16) 918-305-0130(1)(a)...

http://www.cbs.state.or.us/external/bcd ... 305_pr.pdf

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So the powers that be in Oregon believe it is better to prevent a possible flood than to save a human life?

If the GFI trips the appliance is leaking too much current and creating a shock hazard. Repair or replace the appliance.

The UL requirement for acceptable leakage for sump pumps is like .5ma or about 1/10 of the level the GFI should trip at.

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My bad, just reviewed 2008 NEC and these exemptions have been removed

But in Oregon, there are local (state) exemptions to the removed exemptions! (Check your local amendments/rules.)

Like a sump pump in a garage and specific appliances.

The exemptions are at this link on adobe reader page 17 (document page 16) 918-305-0130(1)(a)...

http://www.cbs.state.or.us/external/bcd ... 305_pr.pdf

When you consider those exceptions, note carefully the use of the term "single receptacle." That's different from a duplex receptacle.

-Jim Katen, Oregon

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