Jump to content

Beauty ala Ruud


Recommended Posts

That's an amazing find. I would've made an offer.

I have a 1916 publication with a full page ad for that exact model. It's the original on-demand water heater (cast iron too). "Can you imagine... turn on any hot water faucet at any time and hot water gushes forth until you turn the faucet off again".

As strange as it may sound, I'd love to not only have it, but get it in operation again.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

That's an amazing find. I would've made an offer.

I have a 1916 publication with a full page ad for that exact model. It's the original on-demand water heater (cast iron too). "Can you imagine... turn on any hot water faucet at any time and hot water gushes forth until you turn the faucet off again".

I agree it's wicked cool, but if you took it home with you, what would you do with it?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

That's an amazing find. I would've made an offer.

I have a 1916 publication with a full page ad for that exact model. It's the original on-demand water heater (cast iron too). "Can you imagine... turn on any hot water faucet at any time and hot water gushes forth until you turn the faucet off again".

I agree it's wicked cool, but if you took it home with you, what would you do with it?

Tell the grandkids it's a one-eyed cast iron robot. I see an eye and a nose at the top of the pic.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

That's an amazing find. I would've made an offer.

I have a 1916 publication with a full page ad for that exact model. It's the original on-demand water heater (cast iron too). "Can you imagine... turn on any hot water faucet at any time and hot water gushes forth until you turn the faucet off again".

I agree it's wicked cool, but if you took it home with you, what would you do with it?

My bet would be restoring it to perfect functional condition.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

That's an amazing find. I would've made an offer.

I have a 1916 publication with a full page ad for that exact model. It's the original on-demand water heater (cast iron too). "Can you imagine... turn on any hot water faucet at any time and hot water gushes forth until you turn the faucet off again".

I agree it's wicked cool, but if you took it home with you, what would you do with it?

I picture it in the corner of the library, but my chair would be displaced.

My bet would be restoring it to perfect functional condition.

If the wife were to actually let me bring something like that into the house, I better convert it to a coffee maker. Like certain types of historic buildings, adaptive reuse may be a viable method for preserving some of these outdated building components.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

That's an amazing find. I would've made an offer.

I have a 1916 publication with a full page ad for that exact model. It's the original on-demand water heater (cast iron too). "Can you imagine... turn on any hot water faucet at any time and hot water gushes forth until you turn the faucet off again".

Since you have the ad:

1. I gather the unit on the upper left hand side must be a relief valve?

2. The smaller line, apparently to the pilot, is before the larger unit, so I assume it didn't have a thermocouple. But, the pilot does have its own little thumb-screw shutoff at that top elbow.

3. I can't come up with any idea what the unit just below the main shutoff valve is. It doesn't appear to have any controls or other wires or lines going to it.

4. But, apparently this was, as you say, an "on demand" unit, but very primitive temperature regulation - set it and forget it?

5. You fire it up when you want hot water and turn it down to pilot or off, when done?

The self closing service doors top and bottom are pretty cool.

It's a real beauty. I love old stuff like this - handsome!

I have a very old chemical fire extinguisher - all copper and brass. It has full instructions stamped into a large brass plate. The instructions begin, "To play..."

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Since you have the ad:

1. I gather the unit on the upper left hand side must be a relief valve?

2. The smaller line, apparently to the pilot, is before the larger unit, so I assume it didn't have a thermocouple. But, the pilot does have its own little thumb-screw shutoff at that top elbow.

3. I can't come up with any idea what the unit just below the main shutoff valve is. It doesn't appear to have any controls or other wires or lines going to it.

4. But, apparently this was, as you say, an "on demand" unit, but very primitive temperature regulation - set it and forget it?

5. You fire it up when you want hot water and turn it down to pilot or off, when done?

The self closing service doors top and bottom are pretty cool.

It's a real beauty. I love old stuff like this - handsome!

I have a very old chemical fire extinguisher - all copper and brass. It has full instructions stamped into a large brass plate. The instructions begin, "To play..."

It's a one-page ad, not a manual. I have seen some of these though, in simpler form, made by Humphrey, Hoffman and I think a Rex. Never a Ruud, which is the original automatic water heater.

As water flows, it triggers the main gas valve to open. A standing pilot ignites the gas that heats the copper coil. There's an internal temperature regulator that reduces the gas flow when too hot. When the water flow stops, the main gas valve closes.

Some areas had "coal gas" and the coils required regular cleaning, thus the doors.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 7 months later...

When Michael B. brought up this thread in another post, it reminded me that I came across a cool diagram for these old on-demand water heaters.

Click to Enlarge
tn_2011523224037_ruudwaterheater.jpg

79.21 KB

Thanks Bill, that really helps in understandding how it works. I imagine the only down-side to those units was getting scalded.

Since there isn't a tank, I gather there was no need or application for a relief valve. Or, did the unit merely pre-date such valves?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...