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skylight support


Bain
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The attached photo is of the tubing/housing of a round-lens skylight in a house I checked out yesterday. The housing had no support whatsoever except for a few haphazardly placed strips of duct tape--several pieces of which were partially detached. Does anyone know the proper method of supporting these things? I looked for a manufacturer's label to check them out on the web, but had no luck.

John

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I've seen a couple of these, I think; is this a cheesey plastic dome on the roof, a reflective tube, & a translucent glass lens @ the interior ceiling?

For one thing, the exterior flashing package is a joke. For another, all they do is supply a little tiny glow to the interior lens; no useful light @ all. Proof that marketing can make people cut holes in their roofs for no particular purpose.

I've told my customers that I thought it was a cheap skylite, aka, an expensive hole in the roof, and then continued to slam it in more specific terms related to the flashing. I suppose the tube supports could be slammed also, but that seemed like the least of the problem.

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I saw one of these installed by a homeowner, think it was "Solatube". After slammin' it like Kurt, the homeowner handed me the install instructions. The tape is required, but there should be 3 screws at each tube joint. There should also be a suspension wire kit (sold separately but unknown to the home center where it was purchased) that is basically some 16 gauge wire and eye bolts.

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Thanks fellows. Kurt, your description was right on the money. The light produced down at the lens was practically nonexistent. This particular skylight was installed above a shower---someone's attempt at infusing a little romanticism into bathing, I assume. The flashing was beneath the shingles, so I couldn't get a look at. Thanks for the heads-up on the suspension kit, too. Now if the seller or his realtor calls, I can explain the kind of support that needs to be added.

John

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Thanks a ton, Bill. Possessing that kind of ammunition is priceless. Now I hope the realtor or seller DO call to ask about what's lacking. It's like when a realtor calls about Stab-Lok panels---I zap him or her back an e-mail with fifteen links that detail the woes associated with FP panels.

It's amazing what a company will do to save money. Right there on page six of the Solatube instructions it says that the suspension assembly is sold separately. How much can a couple of eyebolts and a strand of wire cost? It almost makes you understand why someone would spend a few hours cutting a hole in a roof, installing the skylight, and then walk away when page six is reached and it's learned that all the necessary parts to finish the job aren't included. I know I'd be tempted to head toward the shower. [:-paperba

John

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I have installed nearly 300 Solatubes (was the exclusive dealer for Fiarfield (CT)and Westchester (NY) Counties for about 4 years)

Contrary to the bashing by my good buddy Kurt, installed and oriented properly, they are actually pretty good! I never had one leak, and I had three in my own home. The problem is that they are not as easily installed as the manufacturer likes you to think.

They come (or did when I installed them) in 10" 16" and 24". A 10" will light a 10'x10' area. Good for a closet, or over a sink. Installed properly, with the dome reflector facing west, they do a great job lighting the room, and have very little heat loss.

the biggest screw ups in installing them are:

Length of tubing is too long

Improper sealing of the tube sections

Misorientation of the dome reflector

Bad flashing install

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I'm just a crank; I suppose they can work, but I'm going to remain curmudgeonly & heap scorn upon them. [:(!] [:-irked] [:-thumbd]

A nicely installed Velux skylite, OTOH, is always a nice addition to otherwise drab space. I just don't get the tube thing; they don't seem to bring any light in. If I just want a translucent panel glowing part of the day on the ceiling, I'd install a light fixture.

His ol' curmudgeonly self......

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Originally posted by hausdok

Hi All,

There are lots of companies installing these puppies out here on Puget Sound. In most of the cases I've seen, they brought in a lot of extra light. A few did not because they were installed poorly or because the reflectors were oriented the wrong direction. The most common place they are used is in dark hallways and seem to work well to do what they're designed for.

OT - OF!!!

M.

I will grudgingly consider them.[:-eyebrow

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