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rbaake

Narrative reports are less descriptive

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Found this while surfing the web. How is a narrative type report less descriptive? Anyone spending a week writing one?

Frequently Asked Questions

How is a Home Inspection Performed?

While touring and inspecting the prospective property, your Tiger Home Inspector completes an itemized list, which contains a rating system and written comment section that is unique to the property being purchased. At the conclusion of the inspection, you receive a copy of the inspection report on site (as opposed to a less descriptive narrative completed offsite).

What is the difference between a narrative and an itemized list with a written commentary?

A narrative is a typical "boiler plate" with a written explanation completed after the home inspection has been performed. It is usually a group of paragraphs, "plugged in" and written offsite. Frequently, it takes between 3-10 days to receive in the mail.

An itemized list is the inspector's actual rating of each area in detail, completed on-site, during an inspection. The report also includes specific written comments by the Inspector about the property. At the completion of the home inspection, you receive the inspection report prior to leaving the property.

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Found this while surfing the web. How is a narrative type report less descriptive? Anyone spending a week writing one?

Frequently Asked Questions

How is a Home Inspection Performed?

While touring and inspecting the prospective property, your Tiger Home Inspector completes an itemized list, which contains a rating system and written comment section that is unique to the property being purchased. At the conclusion of the inspection, you receive a copy of the inspection report on site (as opposed to a less descriptive narrative completed offsite).

What is the difference between a narrative and an itemized list with a written commentary?

A narrative is a typical "boiler plate" with a written explanation completed after the home inspection has been performed. It is usually a group of paragraphs, "plugged in" and written offsite. Frequently, it takes between 3-10 days to receive in the mail.

An itemized list is the inspector's actual rating of each area in detail, completed on-site, during an inspection. The report also includes specific written comments by the Inspector about the property. At the completion of the home inspection, you receive the inspection report prior to leaving the property.

I suppose it would depend on the inspector. Personally, I don't like checklists, and I don't do on-site reporting. My reasons are many, but primarily I don't want to be in a hurry, and I don't want someone standing over me while I work. I look at lots of reports on line, and I have seen but a few that were prepared on site that wouldn't embarrass me. To try to sell one as being superior without considering WHO is preparing it is folly, IMO.

That being said, I have never heard of anyone taking 3-10 days to get a report to a client. That's just puffery, and would raise red flags with me if I were choosing an inspector.

Tim

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It's blather.....but.....

In some ways, a decent checklist might serve the customers interests just as good, or better, than a blown out narrative.

I can't disagree with the guy about the boilerplate part, though. Most narratives I see are painful, moronic, and not informative.

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I agree with Kurt about boilerplates. I use some and write narrative style reports.

I use to think this was the only way to go, but after reading David Friedman's opinion (Inspectopedia.com), I'm not so sure. I'm starting to think he's right, a combination check-list/narrative may be better.

My narrative "descriptions" can easily take-up 3/4 of a page. Software makes it so easy to add meaningless BS.

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A friend sent me a report for a house he's buying in Arizona. It was filled with more nonsensical stick-and-paste boilerplate than you can imagine. Following a comment about the gutter downspouts needing to be extended away from the house, were three paragraphs about why it was necessary and all the deleterious things that could happen if it didn't occur. Same thing with baluster spacing . . . two paragraphs of hogwash.

There was so much extraneous crap, I got bored reading the thing and wondered how Joe Homebuyer could make any sense of it, and obtain an understanding of what was important and what wasn't.

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1) I have to agree with Kurt: too many inspectors who are writing "narrative" reports are using too much "boiler-plate", often in the form of unaltered and poorly written canned comments that came with the software.

2) I have never seen a primarily checklist format report that is *nearly* as useful to a client who really wants to understand properly condition and what to do about it as a well written narrative version.

And when the checklists are bad, they are truly pathetic.

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I think checklists are fine for a lot of people that just want a list of what's wrong.

For those that want to understand the property, they are useless.

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I meant "partial narrative", not check-list...sorry. Wow, the link above to the sample report...11.33MB, must be all the colors?

I found this report a few years ago, saved it because I liked the formatting, partial narrative style.

This is a very interesting report to say the least. Read it, it's very thorough...

Download Attachment: icon_adobe.gif 300 problems.pdf

448.27 KB

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Hi,

Jimmy will know, but if memory serves Tiger Inspections is an outfit that has about 35 or 40 inspectors spread out through Massachusetts and other parts of New England. Last time I looked at them was years ago and back then they were known for getting in and out of the home really fast.

ONE TEAM - ONE FIGHT!!!

Mike

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...apparently they got out REALLY FAST!

Heres a sample exterior inspection report...

I don't like to bust balls, but the internet is a public forum and if you post something, defend yourself!

As I mentioned in a previous post, if there's no garage, don't include a garage section in the report, and if there's no exterior...don't go outside

Download Attachment: icon_adobe.gif Tiger_Report.pdf

25 KB

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My reporting style diffuses the lines between narrative and checklist. It fits neither. To me, it's a moot question anyway. Narration and checklist doesn't make the report, the inspector does.

Marc

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I meant "partial narrative", not check-list...sorry. Wow, the link above to the sample report...11.33MB, must be all the colors?

I found this report a few years ago, saved it because I liked the formatting, partial narrative style.

This is a very interesting report to say the least. Read it, it's very thorough...

Download Attachment: icon_adobe.gif 300 problems.pdf

448.27 KB

From the Structural Components section of the report:

Major Concern, Repair: There are moisture stains, apparent damage and fungus at the west end of the floor framing -apparently located under the library. The floor framing has evidence of apparent extended exposure to moisture. The west floor joist is split and apparently damaged at the west end of the crawl space - apparently under the library. The OSB floor sheathing is apparently damaged at the west end of the crawl space - apparently under the library. It is recommended that the source of the moisture be identified and repaired as required. The removal of the fiberglass batt insulation installed between the floor joist bays is recommended to determine any concealed floor framing damages at

the house floor framing. Recommend repairs as required.

Apparently, if you say apparently enough, you limit your apparent liability because the apparent intended reader of this garbage apparently can't take it anymore and apparently offs themselves, apparently so they don't have to read 53 pages of this shite.

Jim

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That's about right......

Also, "it" is recommended that the source of the water be located.....relieving "it" from having to figure out what the problem is.

Does anyone know where the expert is, who everyone keeps referring, and who understands everything so we don't have to?

[:-paperba

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...In-Depht, thats just the summery, read the whole thing...in-detail, and call me on Tuesday.

I love this report! Wish I had the time to say this for every one-two bedroom home I do.

Like I said, it's very detailed, and to the point...

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