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Staples in wood roof


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Yes, this is common, Best practice is for them to be hidden, although lower end products end up with exposed staples if they were purchased pref fab. They should also be installed with the laps alternating from left to right.

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Hi,

Download a copy of the Cedar Shake and Shingle Bureau's roofing manual here.

Staples are permitted but different types are used within 15 miles of salt water than the type you'd use further inland. The staples are backing out because they are too short to reach the roof deck. Here's what the roofing manual says (I've underlined some areas for emphasis):

"Staples

If you choose to use staples they must be stainless steel Type 316 in locations within fifteen (15) miles of salt water (Ref. Stainless Steel Industry of North America-Wahington, D.C., www.ssina.com). For locations outside of the salt water zone - Type 304 or 316 must be used. Each Certi-label shake or shingle shall be applied with two (2) staples. Staples must be 16 gauge with crowns 7/16" minimum horizontal, maximum 3/4" horizontal to the Certi-label shake or shingle butt.

Location/Penetration

Fasteners, two (2) per shake or shingle, shall be applied approximately 3/4" from the edge and appoximately 1 1/2" above the exposure line. Fasteners shall be long enough to penetrate into the sheathing at least 3/4" or all the way through. Minimum nail lengths are shown in the fastener chart. Nails and staples must be driven flush with the surface of the Certi-labelTM shake or shingle. Overdriving the fastener can split and/or distort the Certi-label shake or shingle."id="brown">

ONE TEAM - ONE FIGHT!!!

Mike

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The 3rd pic gives me the willies! I hope you checked it carefully and recommended they keep an eye on it. watch for ice damming if you in a cold climate. some architects idea of a good time!!!!!

What, you've never seen lead sheets before?

ONE TEAM - ONE FIGHT!!!

Mike

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Staples are permitted to fasten shakes by code and by installation guidelines.

The reason they're backing out at the ridges is that they're too short to penetrate down to the decking. They should have used fasteners long enough to penetrate through the shakes below and into the decking by 1/2".

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I usually see torch on, I wasn't worried about the material, more the design. from the pics there doesn't seem to be evidence of the staples in the field be too short just the exposed staples from the ridge cap/s. like Bill said

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The 3rd pic gives me the willies! I hope you checked it carefully and recommended they keep an eye on it. watch for ice damming if you in a cold climate. some architects idea of a good time!!!!!

What, you've never seen lead sheets before?

ONE TEAM - ONE FIGHT!!!

Mike

Perhaps LeeBoy was referring to the streaks on the galvanized valley flashing. If the wood shingles are preservative treated, wouldn't the preservative leach out and cause those streaks? It looks corroded.

Marc

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Hi Marc,

Shake roofs leach tannic acid onto flashings. Around here, the acid can cause galvanized steel flashings used on these roofs to rust pretty badly so most use pre-painted steel flashings. Sometimes the lead bibs used on plumbing vents around here will get copper colored streaks on them, so I'd assumed that was lead lining that valley. However, now that I look at it more closely I'm not so sure. It looks like it could be copper flashings and valley lining that's turning green; which is what one would expect. It's hard to tell by looking at the photo without actually seeing the roof in person. I suppose if it weren't lead though one of the brethren would have corrected me hours ago, so...

ONE TEAM - ONE FIGHT!!!

Mike

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Hi Marc,

Shake roofs leach tannic acid onto flashings. Around here, the acid can cause galvanized steel flashings used on these roofs to rust pretty badly so most use pre-painted steel flashings. Sometimes the lead bibs used on plumbing vents around here will get copper colored streaks on them, so I'd assumed that was lead lining that valley. However, now that I look at it more closely I'm not so sure. It looks like it could be copper flashings and valley lining that's turning green; which is what one would expect. It's hard to tell by looking at the photo without actually seeing the roof in person. I suppose if it weren't lead though one of the brethren would have corrected me hours ago, so...

ONE TEAM - ONE FIGHT!!!

Mike

It's terne-coated copper.
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As Bill says, it is copper.

The staples did penetrate the 5/4 strips in the attic.

Here's a photo of the house; it was used in an ad for Lincoln!

If you look closely, you can see the build-up of leafs on both sides in those flat areas.

Click to Enlarge
tn_20123352216_Moodie%20140.jpg

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What year is that Lincoln, late 60's, early 70's. Those older shakes would have been installed with galvanized nails, I think. The stapled shakes came later.

Ridge caps are hard to nail through to the strapping, because the wood will split if you try to use too long of a galvanized nail (bigger diameter). So it is typical for ridge shingles to pop loose after a few years, because they're just tacked to the shakes below in some places.

The ready-made ridge caps have the two shakes stapled together at the edges. You lay them over the ridge and nail or staple them at the tails, under the laps.

Those ridges on the other hand are capped with 24" hand-split tapered cedar shakes. They paid big bucks for that roof, I'd say. Stainless steel doesn't have the grip that hot-dipped galvanized nails have. Anyway, it is typical and not a big deal to tighten them up with a hammer and a few more nails.

That's a bad valley design but they did a nice job of flashing it.

I've got to file that 'terne-coated copper' away in my soft drive, although we'll never see that here.

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