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receptacle placement


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The island countertop overhangs the wall by 11" directly above the receptacle. The receptacle is 24" below the overhang.

Is it correct to say this is not in compliance with NEC, or is there an exception that would allow it in the circumstance pictured.

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That side of the counter is not technically in the kitchen based on the limited photo. It is in the den, breakfast nook, living room, whatever. The receptacle does not have to follow any of the island or kitchen receptacle rules you may be applying.

It looks like there may be a sink in the pennsuila. Some people mistakening apply the "6 ft rule", of which there is no longer any 6 ft rules regarding GFCI with the exception of receptacles near a laundry sink. I RECOMMNEND the receptacle have GFCI because common use is to place a laptop, blender or other appliance on the countertop and use that receptacle. If the appliance falls into the sink, then GFCI is better than not. No NEC requirement assuming this is the "non kitchen" side of the counter.

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I'm getting it mixed up with NEC 210.52©(5).

That reference has to do with required counter top receptacles. In this case, the counter top has it's required receptacles on the other side and this one is actually serving the dining room, and not intended to be a service for the counter top space.

Ben,

I'm not sure why a restriction was put on locating receptacles beneath counter top overhangs greater than 6". Perhaps its a case where the overhang portion of the counter top space would be a position for seating (breakfast bar stools). A person might get their leg entangled in an appliance power cord which could pull a hot appliance from the counter top.

Again, I think the argument would be made that the receptacle in question is not intended to be serving the counter top space, therefore NEC 210.52©(5) (which includes the restriction of receptacles beneath counter top overhangs greater than 6") does not apply.

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It looks to me like as long as there is another receptacle that properly serves this countertop then everything is OK. It's just that this receptacle can't be the one to serve this countertop.

The CodeCheck book that I have has a picture of this situation with a hot crock pot on the countertop and it's plugged in to a receptacle too far below the countertop. The picture shows a baby reaching up to grab the plug, the implication being that the baby could pull the crock pot onto itself. I suppose you could call it unsafe to even have that receptacle there because it could be used for a kitchen appliance, and then the baby-pulling-the-plug scenario comes into play. I don't think I would say that, but I could understand the argument.

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The reason that they do not want an outlet on an island/peninsula with an over hang is to limit the length of the cord. Appliance manufacturers have even shortened the length of the cords to help prevent them from being stretched across the kitchen, counter, etc and becoming a hazard.

I go with a max 6" overhang and no more than 12" from the top of the counter top. Most appliances only come with a 18" to 24" cord now...

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Peninsulas don't need a receptacle. That receptacle is intended to serve the adjacent room, not the counter-top.

I disagree that peninsulas don't need a receptacle.

IRC E3901.4.3 Peninsular countertop space. At least one receptacle outlet shall be installed at each peninsular countertop space with a long dimension of 24 inches (610 mm) or greater and a short dimension of 12 inches (305 mm) or greater. A peninsular countertop is measured from the connecting edge.

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Sure, but there's no requirement of where that receptacle needs to be located in the horizontal dimension. The peninsula starts at the far left side of the photo. A receptacle on the wall there (which is what I normally see) would satisfy that requirement.

Based on what's in the photo, I don't assume that the receptacle in question is intended to serve the peninsula countertop, and I would not make an issue of it.

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Hi,

In new construction around here that would be a GFCI protected receptacle and the receptacles in the adjacent dinette/dining room (whatever you want to call it) are also GFCI protected.

If there are receptacles on the countertop on the other side of that top (breakfast bar - whatever) I'm not going to call it. Common sense says if you're in the kitchen and need to plug something in on the countertop you aren't going to the next room searching. I say that because I have that exact setup; and, though I know there is a receptacle there, I've never tried to plug in a kitchen appliance there because I have plenty of countertop receptacles.

If there were a row of chairs for a breakfast bar there only a horses ass with teeth would go to all the trouble of searching behind those chairs for a receptacle when there are receptacles on the other side of that top.

You can what if this stuff and invent wild scenarios all day long. At some point you just have to stop trying to find reasons to criticize something and use your noggin.

ONE TEAM - ONE FIGHT!!!

Mike

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