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Redneck living roof


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"Should we scrape off the moss?"

"No, don't do that. At this point, the moss is holding the shingles on". [:)]

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That was an easy one. This roof below was harder, It doesn't look too bad, except where the granules are gone off the ribs. I've seen this damage before and wonder if it is from scraping with a snow shovel?

If so, it won't get worse for a while. But I wish I could be more specific on this one.

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The lines in the shingles are at about the same spot as the asphalt sticky spots on the shingle underneath.

I doubt that comes from snow shoveling.

Geeze, I'm glad I now live where I don't have to worry about shoveling snow off the roof!

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I think the ridges visible in the shingles in John's second batch of photos are simply the edges of the layers of roofing underneath this one telegraphing through the roof.

Yes, sometimes that's it, but this was a one layer roof, I'm pretty sure. The upper edge of the first row seems to be visible in the exposed part of the third row. With some additional wrinkles. Thin shingles, no doubt.
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I think the ridges visible in the shingles in John's second batch of photos are simply the edges of the layers of roofing underneath this one telegraphing through the roof.

Nope. If you use a probe or a screwdriver, you'll find that the tabs have buckles with nothing but air immediately beneath them.

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I think the ridges visible in the shingles in John's second batch of photos are simply the edges of the layers of roofing underneath this one telegraphing through the roof.

Nope. If you use a probe or a screwdriver, you'll find that the tabs have buckles with nothing but air immediately beneath them.

Obviously weather conditions there are very different from my neck of the woods but I've never seen that condition. Maybe the shingles are formulated differently also.
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