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Why did the electrician put these *loops* in the two hot SEC's, instead of cutting the wiring and running same straight down into the main lugs - as was done with the neutral cable?

Does the cable bending appear excessive (I think it does). And, what's the problem with over-bending; damaged internal cable wiring (and if so, how does the damage pose a problem)?

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Why did the electrician put these *loops* in the two hot SEC's, instead of cutting the wiring and running same straight down into the main lugs - as was done with the neutral cable?

Does the cable bending appear excessive (I think it does). And, what's the problem with over-bending; damaged internal cable wiring (and if so, how does the damage pose a problem)?

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tn_2012327191438_003.jpg

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It's easier to move into position to terminate at the lug. It also gives you some slack if the lug goes bad and you have to cut the conductor. 2/0 is hard to bend. I've been up to 750 MCM in an industrial plant. It puts ropes in your forearms after a couple years.

Marc

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Why did the electrician put these *loops* in the two hot SEC's, instead of cutting the wiring and running same straight down into the main lugs - as was done with the neutral cable?

Does the cable bending appear excessive (I think it does). And, what's the problem with over-bending; damaged internal cable wiring (and if so, how does the damage pose a problem)?

Click to Enlarge
tn_2012327191438_003.jpg

55.27?KB

It's easier to move into position to terminate at the lug. It also gives you some slack if the lug goes bad and you have to cut the conductor. 2/0 is hard to bend. I've been up to 750 MCM in an industrial plant. It puts ropes in your forearms after a couple years.

Marc

That makes sense, though it appears if the wires were cut to the exact, minimum length needed, one could pull the middle of each cable toward themselves and easily slip the end of the wire into the lug (as was probably done with the neutral).

How 'bout the bend radius? Okay?

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The technical term is "Mickey Mouse Ears." It's just easier to position thick wires like that, as Marc pointed out.

As far as I know, there's no restriction on bending radius of individual wires until you get over 600v.

There are restrictions on the bending radius of "cables" but not wires.

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Jerry, the conductors are too stiff to bend like you propose without a wire bender like Rack-a-tiers makes. Then you need to make sure it is fully seated in the lug. You just cannot ge good leverage with your hands.

Another way would be to cut the conductors to length and loosen the cable clamp, pull the cable up and insert into the lugs and then push the cable back into the panel and re-tighten the clamp. This is not always possible.

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