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The cheapo nylon rope that came with my Werner extension ladder is crapping out. I need a new rope.

What is a good kind of rope to get and would I be able to find something good at the big box stores?

Also, would a larger diameter pulley make things easier? Ever seen anyone change to a larger pulley?

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The cheapo nylon rope that came with my Werner extension ladder is crapping out. I need a new rope.

What is a good kind of rope to get and would I be able to find something good at the big box stores?

Also, would a larger diameter pulley make things easier? Ever seen anyone change to a larger pulley?

I've habitually removed the rope on the first day of anything 32' or under.

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I've habitually removed the rope on the first day of anything 32' or under.

Why's that?

I find that it gets in the way. I can put mittens on the tips and "bounce" them up to the extension I want.

Just general preference I suppose.

I'm trying to visualize but coming up blank. How exactly do to fully extend and retract a 32" ladder without a rope/pulley?

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What Bill said, braided nylon. It is super strong and doesn't give you quite as nasty of a burn. Also holds a knot better than twisted poly.

John, a larger pulley would require a larger clamp on the rung as well, but it would help a little bit.

I need the rope for my 28' but I guess Eric is taller. A foot taller and the arms would be longer too. [:)]

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I've habitually removed the rope on the first day of anything 32' or under.

Why's that?

I find that it gets in the way. I can put mittens on the tips and "bounce" them up to the extension I want.

Just general preference I suppose.

I can dig it, but I can't for the life of me figure out I could get my 28 fiberglass up and down without the rope.

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I can dig it, but I can't for the life of me figure out I could get my 28 fiberglass up and down without the rope.

You bounce it up. Stand on the ground, extend it manually a few rungs and bounce it up as needed. Ropes are problematic.

That's it. Once it is beyond your reach you start climbing and bouncing at the same time.

I've not had to use a fiberglass ladder before but it's probably a little too heavy and stiff for this technique.

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I've not had to use a fiberglass ladder before but it's probably a little too heavy and stiff for this technique.

No, it works pretty much the same. Fiberglass is floppy, only a different floppiness than aluminum.

Dirks, yes, you walk it up, bouncing it off the siding. You usually can't bounce it all the way over the eave; it's more for accessing 2nd story windows kind of thing. There's a reason the ladder safety folks blow a gasket at the process.

If you think that's nuts, you should watch the real ladder monkeys slide down the ladder. They grip it with the insides of their boots on the outside rail, grip it tightly with their hands, and slide down controlling speed by the tightness of their hand grip. It's pretty cool looking albeit totally nuts.

By reading this, the reader agrees to hold the descriptor harmless in perpetuity for any crazy ladder acts they might attempt.

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We only ever did it on tract new home stuff. Everyone's cranking, trying to get it done, etc., etc. It's best left in memories, as it's really freakin' dangerous and stupid, although I have fond memories of being nimble enough to carry it off.

Get some decent line, bouncing ladders on someone else's house isn't right.

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Personally, I prefer yacht braid, color coordinated with my jaunty sailors cap.

Good idea. As Mr Dirks lives close to that other big pond he should have some marine/boat supply stores nearby. The real yachty stuff may be more expensive per foot, but then you don't need much for a ladder and these stores do sell it by the foot from large reels. Actually, he will likely find what he needs in a bin or rack of half-price "shorts". And, yes, you do get a fine choice of colors, perhaps even something that wouldn't clash with Kurt's sailor costume.

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Personally, I prefer yacht braid, color coordinated with my jaunty sailors cap.

Good idea. As Mr Dirks lives close to that other big pond he should have some marine/boat supply stores nearby. The real yachty stuff may be more expensive per foot, but then you don't need much for a ladder and these stores do sell it by the foot from large reels. Actually, he will likely find what he needs in a bin or rack of half-price "shorts". And, yes, you do get a fine choice of colors, perhaps even something that wouldn't clash with Kurt's sailor costume.

John, wear your yellow rubber yachty boots and get a deal on the rope. [:)]

When I was doing shake roofs on a daily basis, we would set the ladder way out from the wall and walk up no hands with a bundle of shakes on the shoulder, then run down facing out.

One day an old carpenter told me we were scaring the crap out of him.

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I don't know what all the hub-bub is about. There's just some who have skills and some that don't. It's not an issue getting around the eaves if you think outside the box. It doesn't cause any more damage than the ladder does leaning on the gutter and you have to remember the ladder mittens.

To each his own, no ropes for me and if not on someone else's house then whos?

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Thanks, John. Hey, with a safety net, I could try hooking the window sill like that.

Re: bouncing the ladder,

I do a similar maneuver inside the house sometimes. Telesteps on the wall under the attic hatch, climb up, move the hatch cover out of the way. Then pushing the top of the ladder away from the wall with one hand, raise a couple of steps up into the hatch opening, climb on up thru the hatch.

This works with Telesteps because they open from the lower rungs and you always have steps available at the top.

Descending, you can collapse a couple of rungs with one hand and lower the ladder back to the wall with the other hand, replace the cover, done.

Keep in mind, I'm only 6 or 7 feet above the floor, and I'm a lightweight, 167 lbs.

I don't recommend the Telesteps. It is a crappy little ladder and not to be trusted, ever.

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