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New construction with 3 prong dryer outlet?


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That is a NEMA 6-30R receptacle. Sometimes used for welders. Here is something from Google:

30 amp. 250 volt

2-Pole

3-Wire Grounding

Uses include large style window air conditioners (30,000 btu), china and pottery kilns, certain machines and office equipment in commercial applications.

2 hp rating

If it was installed for a dryer I would question anything the "electrician" did.

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'Most' modern appliances have a computer module or two and they require a 120 to low voltage power supply as a rule. That is why I would question only 3 prong 240 outlets in a brand new house.

I haven't seen that. The only 240 volt appliances I've seen in residential that have 120 V loads and don't have an internal 240/120 transformer are clothes dryers.

Marc

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'Most' modern appliances have a computer module or two and they require a 120 to low voltage power supply as a rule. That is why I would question only 3 prong 240 outlets in a brand new house.

I haven't seen that. The only 240 volt appliances I've seen in residential that have 120 V loads and don't have an internal 240/120 transformer are clothes dryers.

Marc

Why do they need a neutral connection?
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'Most' modern appliances have a computer module or two and they require a 120 to low voltage power supply as a rule. That is why I would question only 3 prong 240 outlets in a brand new house.

I haven't seen that. The only 240 volt appliances I've seen in residential that have 120 V loads and don't have an internal 240/120 transformer are clothes dryers.

Marc

Why do they need a neutral connection?

The neutral is needed to get the 120 V. The ground is always needed.

Marc

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I see that configuration used with through the wall AC and heat pump units.

If it says 30 amp, then it's 30 amp, but going by this chart, the size of the hots and shape of the ground make it look like it's 15 amp. Maybe the chart is wrong.

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tn_2014121231735_NEMA%206.jpg

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Your chart is most likely correct as far as the configurations are concerned. The difference is the diameter of the receptacle itself. The 15 & 20 ampere versions are a smaller diameter than those 30 amperes and over. Thus the same configuration but different size receptacles and cord caps.

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  • 4 weeks later...

That is a NEMA 6-30R receptacle. Sometimes used for welders. Here is something from Google:

30 amp. 250 volt

2-Pole

3-Wire Grounding

Uses include large style window air conditioners (30,000 btu), china and pottery kilns, certain machines and office equipment in commercial applications.

2 hp rating

If it was installed for a dryer I would question anything the "electrician" did.

This exactly.

If this was installed for a dryer I feel sorry for the client. That is quite sad.

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