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Old patched stucco


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100 yr old house. Lots of stucco patching. Long vertical line at foundation level. Looks like flexible patch material peeling in places.

Does this look bad? Or is it just what happens?

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Looks like a lot of old patched stucco that I see. The last photo looks like a thin patched area that is delaminating. I would not be very concerned, but would indicate that the stucco is in fair to poor condition and will need above average repairs over time or alterations (i.e. new siding). Whether there is greater concern in CA (especially if the building is masonry) is something I cannot answer.

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The photos provoke more questions than answers.

I see quite a bit of cold patches indicating crack "Repairs". So my first is were the cracks cut and repaired or simply smeared with "cream cheese" to hide the cracks. Look closely, cracks will reappear before long if not properly repaired.

If the installation is 100 years old, We are looking at plank sheathing as compared to plywood. Plank sheathing can take more water than plywood.

The amount of cracks bothers me, especially considering we are looking at a limited area. It is important to determine if the stucco is adequately adhered to the structure, or is the only thing holding the stucco to the structure; the stucco itself.

I would suggest moisture content testing to determine if/how much water is getting behind the system, at the same time testing the resistance of the wood sheathing. Core tests would also let you know what is there, especially below that window.

Regarding other details, sealants, etc... more information needed as well as up close examination.

Structurally speaking, if you determine that all is strong and stable, that is great. Cosmetically speaking, I think the only salvation would be a fresh coat (with mesh) of stucco, or another cladding, possibly EIFS or another alternative. Included should be WRB, flashing, etc., I lean towards liquid applied.

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