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Termite shield


Bob White
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While perusing the 1976 HEW Home Inspection document posted in another forum on this site, I ran across Figure 4-2

Download Attachment: icon_gif.gif foundation with termite shield

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The house I greaw up in has these galvanized shields ag foundation walls and piers, but the home I'm inspecting (15 -20 yrs old and newer don't have them.

Why the change? Did the shields not work? Treated sills? Are the shields still a good idea?

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I'm with you Bob.

Those termite shields were quite popular here in Richmond a few years ago. In 14 years I've never seen termite damage in a home that had them. It seemed like a good idea to me.

Another good and similar question, houses that have the old foil backed paper vapor barrier stapled to the underside of the floor framing consistently have framing in exceptionally good condition. (like new!?)

Sometimes it's hard To o understand why certain practices were abandoned.

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My feeble memory seems to recall termite shields being abandoned due to multiple studies showing they didn't do anything. Or, there was some issue w/ improperly installed shields allowing termites in, but preventing us from seeing the activity. Or something.

Either way, I think they got nixed several years ago.

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My thin understanding of termite shields is that they don't actually stop termites, but rather force the buggers to show themselves if they "tube" around the shield to enter the wall. I've seen shields only a handful of times, but I like the idea in general (if that's it).

One would think termites and termite damage would be very common here in Mississippi, but I hardly ever find any. When I do it's almost always on really old houses.

Brian G.

Totally Tubular Dude [:-mohawk]

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Hi,

I think termite shields will work fine. Having had about 10,000 of them as "pets" for a couple of years I know for a fact that they'd probably never be able to get past the lip without falling clear - until they've built a large tube, that is. Maybe the demise of termite tubes is concurrent with the use of pressure-treated woods for mudsills? After all, the chemicals used for pressure-treated woods have been known to be corrosive. What's the point of putting down a shield if the shield will rot away within a few years?

OT - OF!!!

M.

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Apparently not. The worst I've ever seen is tubes up to and along the crease forming the downward portion of the shield. I've not seen them tube upside down and downward to and over the lower edge of the shield.

I just this afternoon saw a pantry door frame and casing eaten up thanks to termites. My finger went right in.

Bring back termite Shields!

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Originally posted by Jeff Remas

Subterranean termites cannot make a mud tube around the metal if it is correctly bent.

Wrong. I've seen masses of termites go around all manner of termite shields, even ones I've bent myself right to the good book diagrams. Pre-digital camera though, so you gotta take my word for it.

That's why God invented Termidor.

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Soil varys pretty widely across the state, but we have mostly reliable clay and clay / gravel mixes locally. Other than that there's a large area of wildly expansive soils west and south of me; makes things interesting sometimes.

I saw a photo a few years back of a spot where termites had built a tube at an upward 45 degree angle to get around the edge of a shield. It was impressive determination and ingenuity, I thought.

Brian G.

Dreading the Arrival of the Formosan Cousins [:-wiltel]

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Ever watch 'em built those?

First Mr. Worker comes forward checks out the work area (I think it's smelling it but I'm not sure.), then it smears the area with some saliva. Then it turns around and backs into place like a cement truck backing in next to a foundation and pushed out a pellet. Then, just like the dutiful mason it is, it turns around and uses its mandibles to push the brick firmly into place in the saliva. When he's exhausted all of the pellets he can, he leaves to go eat and another one pulls in behind him and continues the work. Meanwhile, the soldiers, like mafia union bosses, surround the worksite on all sides and make loud clicking sounds to ward off anyone approaching the work site. Pretty kewl!

OT - OF!!!

M.

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If you've never been close enough to hear these guys in action check out

http://www.homesafeinspection.com/index ... Itemid=112

Turn the volume up.

We have become a disposable society. Consumers will accept crap and inferior products everyday knowing full well there is a bigger, better, latest, and greatest just around the corner. Therefore industries are happy to oblige providing them just what they think they "need" at less expense. Look at your own market aren't older home sales in a slump compared to new home sales?

Around here the PB are high end and no more shields hell it's hard to locate a pretreat certificate on a lot of the new builds. Maybe the 6 mil under slabs is good enough???

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Hmmm..... I thought last time I drove through Geogia on my way to FL I was beginnin to feel like the bottom half was pretty sandy. But, that Rt 95 and could have been pretty close to the ocean? What do I know? I was just passing through and glancing. At any rate, the little buggers just LOVE it here and you can see them trying to make their way to the sill plate in practically 2-3 out of every 10 crawlspaces.

And, yes I actually have watched them immediately begin closing a tube I broke. It was pretty amazing.

I've seen some tubes that had become super highways out of necessity. Once they really get going look out! Those are the crawlspaces that as soon as the million candle light flash light comes on, I'm thinking to myself, "Uh, oh..."

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Originally posted by mgbinspect

Hmmm..... I thought last time I drove through Geogia on my way to FL I was beginnin to feel like the bottom half was pretty sandy. But, that Rt 95 and could have been pretty close to the ocean?

You are correct but red clay is dominate in Georgia. Georgia is also known as the peach state and is the largest State east of the Mississippi River (land area). Now with that distinction one can ride the rapid transit train from here to Atlanta if one has a ticket [^].

There are other States that grow more peaches than Ga. Never could figure why we are called the peach state?

Paul B.

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