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Compressed tile roof


Jim Katen
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I know there are a few Brits on this board . . .

Can you guys, or anyone else, tell me about "compressed concrete tile roofs"?

I've got some buyers who happen to be from the UK and they happen to be buying a house that has a such a roof on it. They tell me that it's the type of concrete tile that they have back home.

The sellers want me to use a roof ladder rather than walk on the tiles. The buyers say that's how it's done in England too.

Is there really any need for this? I've inspected a fair number of concrete tile roofs by just walking on them with my very own feet. Never had a problem.

- Jim Katen, Oregon

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How old is it? The older concrete tiles (from the '20's) will crumble if you walk on them. New concrete can, but usually doesn't.

I busted on one time in a cavalier moment of thinking it was OK to walk on them. If the seller says don't walk, I wouldn't walk.

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Originally posted by kurt

How old is it? The older concrete tiles (from the '20's) will crumble if you walk on them. New concrete can, but usually doesn't.

I busted on one time in a cavalier moment of thinking it was OK to walk on them. If the seller says don't walk, I wouldn't walk.

I don't know how old the tiles are but the house was built in 1970.

Either we didn't use concrete tiles in this area in the '20s or they simply didn't last. Concrete tiles from the '50s are crumbling here.

Ever hear the term "compressed concrete tile?"

- Jim Katen, Oregon

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Originally posted by Jim Katen

Originally posted by kurt

Ever hear the term "compressed concrete tile?"

- Jim Katen, Oregon

Yeah, that kind of threw me off. I'm assuming (which is always dangerous) that it's just your basic concrete tile made in a press, hence, "compressed".

I've busted 2 tiles in my career; I can still remember both of them, and the sickening musical "snap" when they went. It's a heartbreaking feeling.

Confession; I didn't say anything about one of them. There were enough other messed up tiles that I figured no one would know I busted one.

Don't anyone tell.......

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I've heard and read the term "compressed cement tile" over there. They were referring to what we call cement-asbestos shingles here.

Jim wrote: "I've inspected a fair number of concrete tile roofs by just walking on them with my very own feet."

That's great! I'm still leasing a pair.

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Well...I'm one of the Brits, but I left the old country 32 years ago, long before I had any interest in roofs. I couldn't even tell you what was on the roof of the last house I lived in, although I was there for over 12 years. Probably the only roofs I bothered to look at back then were the quaint thatched ones. Wish I could help but never heard the term "compressed concrete tile".

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Originally posted by Richard Moore

Well...I'm one of the Brits, but I left the old country 32 years ago, long before I had any interest in roofs. I couldn't even tell you what was on the roof of the last house I lived in, although I was there for over 12 years. Probably the only roofs I bothered to look at back then were the quaint thatched ones. Wish I could help but never heard the term "compressed concrete tile".

Too bad. I was hoping you'd be one of the people who'd know.

Now I'll have to fly over there to learn about this stuff.

Do you suppose I can be back by Wednesday?

- Jim Katen

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Originally posted by Scottpat

I called my brother in-law who was a builder in Scotland for many years. He said that compressed concrete roofs are the same as our cement asbestos shingles. They used them in place of slate roofs.

Thanks Scott. That makes sense. After talking with the buyer again, I think she's simply talking about regular ol' concrete roof tiles. She was probably using a term that she'd heard back home without really understanding what it meant.

The owner insists that I not walk on the roof. It seems that there's a history of dumbasses walking on it and cracking the tiles.

I told her I'd look carefully at it from the top of my ladder. If I feel that I can't tell the whole story from there, I'll offer to bring a bucket truck in to get me where I need to be. (Thanks to Larry Cerro for that idea.)

- Jim Katen, Oregon

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Yeah,

I see so many chimneys that need parapet or flue work and shake roofs that need to be properly cleaned that I've thought about opening up a separate company that repairs stacks and cleans shake roofs and a bucket truck, or one of those towable buckets, would probably be just the ticket to work from.

You know what would be cool? Being able to take the client up too and let the client put eyes on the damage.

OT - OF!!!

M.

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Originally posted by hausdok

Yeah,

I see so many chimneys that need parapet or flue work and shake roofs that need to be properly cleaned that I've thought about opening up a separate company that repairs stacks and cleans shake roofs and a bucket truck, or one of those towable buckets, would probably be just the ticket to work from.

You know what would be cool? Being able to take the client up too and let the client put eyes on the damage.

OT - OF!!!

M.

How about if you give the seller and their agent a close-up view of the roof in your bucket and leaving them up there until you finish the inspection with your client!

You could be nice and leave a bottle of water and a couple of snacks for them while they wait

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