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Cedar siding over stucco


Brandon Whitmore
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I have a 1920's house coming up that has some type of cedar siding installed over the original stucco . (per architect purchasing the home).

I am curious as to the installation details I will need to look for with this type of application.

Should there be a WRB installed over the stucco?

What are acceptable fastening methods, etc. ?

Thanks in advance

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I will hang out and listen for the responses of the experts.

Meanwhile, do you know how long this wood siding has been on there?

Time is always a good test. If significant time has passed since the installation and its secure and in good condition, that is a hint that it was generally a good installation. That's our main responsibility right? Is it secure and in good condition after x # of years? It's not as easy to criticize something that has stood the test of time.

Flashing around windows and doors might be a point of interest. You have to think about how the thickness of the siding may have effected the sills and spill plates and whatnot. The windows were probably replaced too so all of that may have been addressed then.

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I don't see how you could hang wood siding on stucco. They would have to pre-drill all of the nail holes. I don't have a clue as to how or what would be needed to hang wood siding on a stucco clad home. The stucco would already have a moisture barrier in place, so I would not think that an additional one would be needed. I'm betting that our other friends in the Northwest have seen this before.

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Hi,

It could be done by installing vertical pressure-treated nailers through the face of the stucco wtih stainless steel or double-hot dipped galvanized screws and then installing the siding normally with nails.

You wouldn't need a WRB because stucco is at least the equivalent of a WRB and will have a double layer of felt behind it. The felt behind the stucco allows it to drain and the wood siding will drain because it'll be a rain screen. However, if the siding isn't fully sealed on all sides and edges - either by back-priming or using Wohlman's or something similar - the siding is liable to cup like crazy - or not. It'll all depend on whether or not they've vented the rainscreen. Cedar breather at the bottom and a narrow slot at the top should allow air movement and drainage.

ONE TEAM - ONE FIGHT!!!

Mike

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Take a close look at the foundation too and check for movement in the structure. Stucco doesn't handle movement very well. It may have been cracking up due to movement.

Wood siding would be more forgiving to the movement so maybe it was put up cover the inevitable cracking of the stucco that would continue as a result of movement.

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Alrighty,

I am glad I posted the question, but it did me no good on this home. I have no idea how they came up with the fact that there was originally a stucco siding material.

It was a side over, but it was a single layer of cedar shingle siding installed over the original 2 layer cedar shingle siding. The siding installer installed a lath strip along the original siding, and installed a single layer of cedar shingles over the existing siding. The installation looked terrible, and I am unsure how they were able to slide the new siding behind the existing siding.

Always something new.

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